Anyone got the new LV honing guide?

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If you've gotten one already, please share your "first on your block" experiences with us.
Dave
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Being one of many who wasted their money on the original, poor design I won't use LV for my next honing guide. Here's where I'll go: http://www.alisam.com /
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wrote:

These guides have the same limitation that the original Veritas had. None of them will handle a #8 jointer blade (2 5/8" wide) with a 1" thick waterstone. That's why I ended up making my own guide.
Bob
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Would you show us a shot of it?
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I made it pretty much exactly like Jeff Gorman's plans at http://www.amgron.clara.net/sharpeningpoints/HoningJig/hgindex.htm .
I'm sorry I am in a location where I don't have access to my digital camera.
Bob
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Ah yes. Me too, currently in the making but something of a variation from that exact design. I laminated two slats of hard maple, rounded the front underside, brace drilled a 1/4" hole to center the lever cap which is now mounted with slotted round head machine screw, brass washer and wing nut underneath, the edge of the lever cap is 1/16" up from the front cutting end of the jigs main body. Still need to come up with a wheel design and it's mounting legs.
Do you have any suggestion as to an axle hardware that will work well through a section of dowel as the wheel, yet connect to flat maple slats (as the legs) and still be able to spin without binding?
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BillyBob wrote:

IT also shares a major defect of the LV design - the iron holding mechanism being downward pressure applied by a disk. Doesn't prevent the iron form rotating even while you are tightening it or while you are honding.
I really like the side clamps for holding.
The wide wheel et of this guide does solve one major defect of the LV guide.
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The Alisam guide will handle a 2 5/8" blade on a 1" stone. The metal alignment clip can be removed on the older version or the latest models have a Delrin ring that act as an alignment "slide", (using the circumference of the round barrel to index off to square the blade), which can easily be slipped on and off to accommodate the #8 jointer blade. The other two models (SS2, SS3) will accept up to a 3 inch wide blade with the slide in place. You can buy one of these and build a simple hardwood frame around the stone to raise the SS3 for 1 inch stone use OR build a platform to raise the stone for use with the SS2. Of course another option is to buy either of these models and purchase the side supports only of the SS1, (actually this will give the SS1 the bevel honing range of the other two models, from 5 to 60 degrees but only the 15 to 45 degree marks are lasered in so you just keep track of the clicks past 45 or before 15). As far as the round toggle foot clamp allowing the blade to move while tightening, we are providing a PSA strip of sandpaper that adheres to the bottom of the blade slot. This prevents all movement of the blade.
" Rolling a wheel through the slurry and mashing it into the grit and muddying up the inside of the wheel's spindle. Rediculous." The wheels of the Sharpening Sled are hardened, double rubber sealed, industrial roller bearings and are press fit onto their "spindles". Therefore the slurry does not enter into the bearing or ''spindle" to bearing contact area.
The LV honing guide WAS the best guide out there. I believe we have come up with improvements on it and all the other guides available. The Sharpening Sled is the next generation of honing guides. Pricey? Well it's made in the USA, supporting your neighbor next door, a quality product, (mainly anodized aluminum, brass and steel, even the labels/index marks are precision lasered in, not stick on labels) and it does what it is supposed to do better than the competition. If you feel the cost is an issue, by all means buy the next best guide from Lee Valley. It is a proven, older design that has worked well for years within it's limitations. By the way I just came back from a presentation given by Mr. Robin Lee. He was just terrific. His talk on the history of Lee Valley/Veritas, their current products, on production methods and new products was exceptional! What a great company with beautifully designed tools that will be around for generations. Robin, thanks again. Tim Queeno
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Just a comment about Robin Lee and Veritas.
I used to teach basic marketing classes and do some consulting now and then. I always used Lee Valley and Veritas as an example of what I referred to as "excellence marketing". Basically the quality of the product and servie became the primary mareting vehicle. A rare event in today's business environment.
Years later I came across Robin Lee on this forum. So I asked a number of questions about veritas. Robin wrote right back and told me he was traveling for a few days. But he would get back to me when he got back into town. Which is exactly what he did.
He proceeded to tell me more about their design philosophy. And it exceeded all my expectations and confirmed everything I used to teach in my classes. And he took the time to explain it to me. An anomymous poster on this forum. I felt honored,
Yes, Robin Lee is a class act. I will endorse that both professionally and personally. He has built a company based on some very high ideals. And we all benefit from it.
I understand that some big money folks have offered to buy him out too. And he did not take the bait. So the quality tools and service will continue.
Thanks Robin, for everything.
Lee Michaels
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So what *on Earth* does all of that have to do with the discussion of the qualities and functions of the tools in this thread? Can you answer that?
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Tim,
Maybe you can answer a question I've hade about the Alisam guide; I've been intrigued by it, but one thing bothers me about it.
Currently I am using the Richard Kell honing guide that rides atop the stone.
OK, the Alsam does not ride on the stone itself but on the frame you build around the stone. This is good for 3 reasons that I can see: 1. the wheels don't ride in the slurry; 2. the wheels (or wheel) does not possibly score the stone; 3. you can use the entire stone surface for sharpening, assuming the surrounding frame is wide enough.
The big problem I have is how do you accurately reference the surface of several different stones to the level of the frame. For example:
I use 4 stones of different grits for the full sharpening routine. Each one has a measurably different thickness. When I am done with the 1000 grit stone, I move on to the 4000 grit stone. I do not remove the blade from the honing guide till I am done with all 4 stones. Since my honing guide is referenced to the stone surface itself the bevel as set by the honing guide does not change from stone to stone.
With the Alisam I would have to shim each stone individually so that each stone is the same exact height relative to the surrounding frame. For this shimming procedure to be accurate it seems like it would be awfully tedious.
That, or build a separate frame for each stone.
But then what do you do as the stones lose thickness due to wear and frequent flattening ?
Thanks, Ken
Tim wrote:

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Ken, First off, you don't need to build a frame for the Sharpening Sled to ride on. I only suggested that if you have say a 3/8 in. diamond plate and 2 in. stones and want to use one model over all stones without the expense of buying the optional side supports. If your stones are 2 in. thick varieties but some worn to 1.5 in. for example the SS2 will be fine for all your stones. With that said, one of the benefits of the Alsiam guide, more precisely, the positive stop detents with precision laser engraving to set your bevel angle, allow you to easily raise or lower the iron to contact the different heights of stones you may be using at one setting. This is not tedious. You simply set the guide over the new stone and slightly loosen the toggle foot clamp just enough to move the blade to contact the new stone, check for squareness with alignment slide and retighten. Should take seconds! The accuracy is built in.You did not change the bevel angle at all. If the stone is a thicker one, just loosen the iron in the jig before placing over the stone. Hope this answeres your question. Tim Queeno
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The Alisam guide will handle a 2 5/8" blade on a 1" stone. The metal alignment clip can be removed on the older version or the latest models have a Delrin ring that act as an alignment "slide", (using the circumference of the round barrel to index off to square the blade), which can easily be slipped on and off to accommodate the #8 jointer blade. The other two models (SS2, SS3) will accept up to a 3 inch wide blade with the slide in place. You can buy one of these and build a simple hardwood frame around the stone to raise the SS3 for 1 inch stone use OR build a platform to raise the stone for use with the SS2. Of course another option is to buy either of these models and purchase the side supports only of the SS1, (actually this will give the SS1 the bevel honing range of the other two models, from 5 to 60 degrees but only the 15 to 45 degree marks are lasered in so you just keep track of the clicks past 45 or before 15). As far as the round toggle foot clamp allowing the blade to move while tightening, we are providing a PSA strip of sandpaper that adheres to the bottom of the blade slot. This prevents all movement of the blade.
" Rolling a wheel through the slurry and mashing it into the grit and muddying up the inside of the wheel's spindle. Rediculous." The wheels of the Sharpening Sled are hardened, double rubber sealed, industrial roller bearings and are press fit onto their "spindles". Therefore the slurry does not enter into the bearing or ''spindle" to bearing contact area.
The LV honing guide WAS the best guide out there. I believe we have come up with improvements on it and all the other guides available. The Sharpening Sled is the next generation of honing guides. Pricey? Well it's made in the USA, supporting your neighbor next door, a quality product, (mainly anodized aluminum, brass and steel, even the labels/index marks are precision lasered in, not stick on labels) and it does what it is supposed to do better than the competition. If you feel the cost is an issue, by all means buy the next best guide from Lee Valley. It is a proven, older design that has worked well for years within it's limitations. By the way I just came back from a presentation given by Mr. Robin Lee. He was just terrific. His talk on the history of Lee Valley/Veritas, their current products, on production methods and new products was exceptional! What a great company with beautifully designed tools that will be around for generations. Robin, thanks again. Tim Queeno
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Do you work for Alisam?
Did I state that there is a serious problem with the Alisam rollers on a stone?
I did not.
It is a product of design that I...
*agree* with...
...much more than other products.
Is that a problem?
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Personaly, I cannot afford that, and it seems beyond principle (of whatever sort, economics?) to buy an Alisam at that cost. So, I'll try and make one myself out of hardwood. Wheels to the sides of the stone. I simply cannot stand the idea of rolling a wheel through the slurry and mashing it into the grit and muddying up the inside of the wheel's spindle. Rediculous. The new Mk II is perfect for scary sharpening though. Someone argue back, please!
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Have a closer look. The wheels ride to the sides, not atop the stone or sandpaper. Not being able to afford a tool isnt a valid reason to label that tool or its price as 'rediculous'.

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I know that about the Alisam. I was talking about any guide that has a central single wheel to ride on, which is rediculous for water stones. You and me are the ones with the right idea.
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I've found the Stanley guide (with a wide roller) to be acceptable on water stones. The Eclipse guide though (with a narrow roller) puts a tramline into the stone within one chisel's use.
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I bought one about 15 years ago made in Japan for waterstones.
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AAvK says...

This article makes a strong case for sharpening by hand and not using a guide at all: http://www.antiquetools.com/sharp/index.html .
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