Anyone else here hone their jointer blades after replacement?

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I think there was some reference to using paper to protect the table; I wonder how well that really works. I'd also be concerned about getting all the grit and filings inside the works of the jointer.
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Jim Weisgram wrote:

dave
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FWIW,
http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM -420
I used one of these theother day to touch up the knives that have been in use on my 8" jointer for the past 6 months and it made a very noticable improvement. I will make a point this thing on a faily regular basis.

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I've been fascinated by this thread, and some of the thought experiments about why this will or will not work (particularly the idea of why not just hone your plane blades the equivalent way). I note that the page from the PM manual that was posted on abpw refers to this technique as jointing the blades, not honing them. I found another source that describes the same process. Feirer's Cabinetmaking and Millwork, c 1970, follows a discussion of various alternative methods for grinding jointer knives, and how to install them, with this paragraph on page 258 (all typos mine):
********** After the jointer knives have been sharpened and reset, it is wise to joint the knives so they are exactly the same height. Cover all but about one-fourth the length of a large abrasive stone with wax paper. Place the stone on the rear table with the exposed section over the knives. Clamp a wooden stop block to the front table to help guide the stone. Lower the table until the stone barely touches the knives. [reference to illustration] Turn on the poser. When the cutterhead is revolving, move the stone slowly from one side to the other. A true cutting circle will result. Be sure to joint the entire length of the knives. The joint or land (sometimes called the heel) should not be wider than 1/32". After jointing, replace the fence and guard. *********
I can't vouch for the technique based on personal experience, but I have found Feirer's book to be a pretty dependable reference. Combined with the page from PM, which is not a fly-by-night tool company either<g>, I tend to think there may be merit to trying this.
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alexy said:

The blade 'jointing' technique has probably fallen from favor by the proliferation of both homemade and commercial magnetic blade setting jigs that are pretty capable of getting blades accurately aligned to each other and the out-feed table - dependant, of course, on the user's skill and determination. Some of those suckers are really aggravating to align. And personal injury law suits have probably helped push it along. Some folks can break an anvil in a sandbox.
Greg G.
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to align the blades when installed.

and the resultant cut quality, this does make me wonder...

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