Anyone else here hone their jointer blades after replacement?

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I hone my blades per the instructions that came with the 54a jointer, which means holding a sharpening stone over the blades and firing up the jointer (using precautions as listed in the manual). I like to do that because I'm not perfect at getting 3 blades precisely set to the same gnat's ass height. Once I think I'm within 2 or 3 thou, I let the stone do the "rest".
Dave
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David wrote:

Seems to me that this would somewhat negate the whole point of putting a specific bevel angle on the blade, if you're just going to grind it off again after remounting the blades.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

problem, Chris. the process is "honing". it's very subtle.
Dave
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It's also at completely the wrong angle.
Bad idea. Don't do it.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

class, so I DON'T think honing is a "bad" idea, as you suggested.
Dave
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David wrote:

off my jointer, each and every time I run wood over it.
Dave
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You'll no doubt also be interested in a tub of my Patent Anti-Elephant Omnibus Discouragement Dust. I sprinkle it out of the windows every time I travel by bus and have yet to be plagued by elephants. It obviously works perfectly.
I hone my jointer blades on the machine, with a diamond hone. But I do it with the machine very much off, and I use the correct angle for the blades, not a tangent.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

quality of the edge, my friend, your preconceptions notwithstanding.
Dave
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David wrote:

Not picking sides or anything here, just truly curious. Wouldn't what Dave is talking about doing result in pretty much the same thing as micro bevel?
-John in NH
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No, a micro bevel is just a steeper bevel. It still provides clearence. The jointer method being discussed provides zero clearence.

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it provides a zero relief angle.
the jointer will still cut as long as the face is very small. because the relief angle is zero, there is more support behind the edge, so it will last a little longer before it needs sharpening. since the blades are now all cutting at exactly the same height you may actually get a better cut than you would have with the sharper blades before.
at least that's the theory....
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snipped-for-privacy@all.costs wrote:

Ahh, thanks for that, both of you. I was scratching my head trying to figure out what CW meant by 'clearance', but it makes total sense now. Friday afternoon brain cramp, I guess.
-John in NH
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Sure does. Take your Stanley #5, extend the blade about .002", run it accross a stone. Now, take that plane to a piece of wood. How well does it cut?

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CW wrote:

In the meantime, I'll continue to get EXCELLENT results from my long lasting edges on my Powermatic jointer, YOUR NAY SAYING NOT WITHSTANDING.
Dave
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wrote:

A joiner with that kind of geometry is called a burnisher .....mjh
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Yes, a subtle dulling.

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CW wrote:

Dave
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Only when done by anyone.

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CW... ya oughta know better than to get in a titfertat with bay area davie...
but the procedure of spinning the blades against a stone isn't totally bunk. I'd never do it to a woodworking machine, but there are some setups where it really is the right thing to do.
it's basically a fine adjustment that does the same thing as the first bit of use of the machine- it dulls the blades a little bit, producing a microbevel (a tiny one only) with 0 relief angle. the edge produced is not as sharp as it was before this, but it will last longer.
done even slightly wrong it will do serious damage to your blades, your jointer and likely your body as well.
don't try it at home, folks.
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snipped-for-privacy@all.costs said:

I thought so... Hey, Dave. ;-)

This is the conclusion I came to as well. The physics of the process just didn't add up to being the correct angle for 'honing'.

This, I am certain of.

Since you seem to be fairly well versed in this area, how about hand honing the installed blades with a diamond paddle for a few strokes, maintaining the original angles of the bevel - minus a degree. This is what I have been doing to sweeten the edges before cutting something difficult. Easy to rest the paddle hand on the outfeed table and hold the cutter head at the proper angle with the other.
I know the stroke direction isn't optimal, but it sure seems to work.
Greg G.
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