Any Way to Protect American Cherry Wood Flooring?

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I want to buy an engineered wood floor that uses plywood in the middle and a veneer of American Cherry on the surface. I have been warned by everyone that the American Cherry is very soft and will not take hard use by kids or animals, or the occasional dropped object. Is there any clear finish we can have someone paint or spray on the floor that would greatly strengthen the surface and protect the wood?
--
W



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IMHO you shouldn't even be thinking about using veneered plywood for flooring. One of the great advantages of hardwood floors is that when they become dented, scratched, or worn -- and all wooden floors will, regardless of species -- they can be sanded smooth and refinished.
You can't do that with veneered plywood.
And this has absolutely nothing to do with how hard the surface veneer is. It's a function solely of how thick it is.
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and a

everyone

or

flooring. One of the

scratched, or worn --

smooth and

It's a function solely

So there are pluses and minuses to solid wood flooring. The plus is you can refinish it many times. The negatives are that it will tend to warp over time and might warp faster after a water spill. Engineered wood tends to lie flatter and will take water spills better. A thicker veneer on an engineered plywood can be refinished about three times as well.
In any case, this thread was supposed to be about hardening the surface of whatever product you do install, and more generally about the suitability of American Cherry for any kind of hardwood flooring.
--
W



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On 3/11/2016 10:59 PM, W wrote:

It does not tend to warp over time. My floor is not warped.
You are warped.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

A water "spill" isn't going to affect hardwood. Anything that will affect hardwood will completely destroy anything engineered.

There isn't anything that can be done to make it "harder" against dents, and such. The finishes that are typically used on higher end pre-finished flooring products are "hardened" in the scratch resistance sense. You won't put it on with a brush, though (the finish is generally UV hardened).
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Not true. My home was built in 1955, and the hardwood floors are not warped. My parents' home is even older, some time in the early 1920s, and the hardwood floors are still nice and even. In fact, I don't recall *ever* seeing a home with warped hardwood floors that had not experienced some sort of *major* water problem.

Do you own a mop?

How many times can solid wood be refinished?

Pointless. *All* hardwood floors, regardless of species, will be scratched by pet claws, abraded by dirt stuck to the soles of your shoes, and dented by dropped objects if hard and heavy enough.
Veneered plywood will dent much more easily than solid wood.

*Solid* cherry is fine for hardwood flooring. Among commonly used flooring woods, it's not as hard as hickory, hard maple, or any of the oaks, but it's a lot harder than pine.
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On Sat, 12 Mar 2016 13:37:03 -0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

...and there is a *lot* of SYP flooring around.
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On 3/12/2016 10:17 AM, krw wrote:

Yes, but it does not hold up well. My son's house has it, built in 1750, and the wear in spots is visible. Out of warranty too.
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;-)
The wear is a feature.
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On Sat, 12 Mar 2016 11:43:27 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

LOL!
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Oh, those shoddy colonial builders :)
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and a

everyone

or

flooring. One of the

scratched, or worn --

smooth and

It's a function solely

If I go with American Cherry whole wood planks, how does this change my question in any way? American Cherry is a soft wood. If children play on it, or dogs jump on it, or I drop a heavy object on it, there will be permanent marks. The fact that I could someday refinish it does not change the fact that I have to live with that damage until I refinish it.
The point of my question is to find if there is a way to provide extra hardening on the surface of a soft wood.
--
W



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No, it is not. Who told you that?
It's not as hard as hard maple or oak, no, but by no means is it a soft wood.

This is true of *all* hardwood floors, regardless of species.

This isn't really relevant, since cherry isn't a soft wood, but ... no, not really. Varnish is only a few mils thick, and won't provide any significant protection from impact. I suppose you could coat it with epoxy...
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On 3/12/2016 8:39 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Epoxy won't prevent the damage. There's really nothing I know of that would prevent damage. It's all a thin coating. It's really the wood that is resistant.
Even steel would show wear, so what is being asked is not really available. See if you can get a force field made :-)
--
Jeff

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wrote:

The manufacturing process of the engineered flooring lessens the softness, ( compressed in a huge press with tons of pressure ). If you are really concerned do some actual research on the product and manufacturer.
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On 03/12/2016 12:54 AM, W wrote: ...

...
Well, cherry isn't _terribly_ soft but it is on the softer end of most hardwood flooring, yes...
As others have said, there's really no magic film that can be put over the surface to stop denting from a hard, heavy object being dropped on the floor; the manufactured floorings use very good finishes for abrasion and scratching albeit again there are levels of quality there depending on the price point and manufacturer of course.
If you're really concerned and are selecting flooring, the obvious answer is to go with a species on the harder end of the scale or perhaps you'd be happier in the long run with another material than wood entirely.
<http://www.hoskinghardwood.com/Department/Hardwood-Floors/Wood-Hardness-Chart.aspx?dId=7&pageId > <http://tinytimbers.com/janka.htm
The latter shows a wider variety that places cherry more in the overall scale of woods rather than on the more restricted scale of the previous.
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On Fri, 11 Mar 2016 22:54:40 -0800, W wrote:

answered more than once : NO!
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wrote:

The factory applied aluminum oxide fortified ultra-violet cured finish is about as hard and tough as you are going to get - as far as protection goes. It will not prevent "denting" of the surface although it WILL reduce it somewhat. If you want something truly hard and durable - and very dent resistant - go with a carmelized bamboo. It is EXTREMELY hard - up to 10 times as hard as oak or maple. There are a few exotic hardwoods that approach the hardness of bambee - but they are not cheap.
Your other alternative is to put a thick layer of tempered glass over the cherry. It lets the grain show through better than the previously recommended concrete - - - -
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On Sat, 12 Mar 2016 14:58:21 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I've had bamboo floors in two houses now. I just wanted to point out that there is a big difference between styles and "finishes". We had "carbonized medium" (I assume that's what you meant by "caramelized") with vertically laminated the first time. The stuff was great. I'd do that in a heartbeat. The last house, however, was "natural" and was laminated horizontally. That stuff really sucked. It scratched *really* easily and dented pretty badly, too. The differences in finish and lamination direction *really* matters.

How about having a spare floor, to show off to the neighbors? After all, that's what Madison Square Garden does. You can do anything with an unlimited budget!
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"strand woven" is supposed to be the best as far as hardness and durability - and it looks like wood. And I was wrong - the "carbonized" is softer than the natural finish.
As with hardwood, the aluminum oxide enhanced finish is superior to a polyurethane varnish finish.

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