any value to oak cross-sections?


We recently lost the largest valley oak in the county, leaving us with a 20 ft. stump, 6-8 ft. in diameter . I haven't thoroughly investigated yet, but I believe it is sound. Is there any value for 6 in. cross sections of the tree as raw material (e.g. for a table), and if so, what could I expect to get for such pieces? (Would some thickness other than 6 in. be ideal?)
I am in the San Francisco Bay Area.
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On 8/22/2005 11:30 PM Jack Fox mumbled something about the following:

prohibitive to ship.
If it's a 20 ft stump, then it should be able to be cut down and milled as well.
--
Odinn
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Jack Fox wrote:

It's impossible to dry cross grain w/o <extensive> checking/cracking so unless that is acceptable there's no point in the idea of end grain slabs.
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That's a very big oak tree. Wow. Were it mine I would speak with a sawyer to see what could be done. Not many mills these days are equipped for that sized butt. A chainsaw carver might be thrilled to go at a piece like that. Indian totem pole? Throne? Gigantic dugout canoe?
I think it would be very neat indeed to make some very simple, solid and *heavy* end tables, nicely finished. How about 20"x20"x32" cubes(?), with the edges slightly rounded and a bit wavy, handplaned (sound fun?) on three visible sides to add some depth. Tres cool, and practically (if not totally) indestructible.
JP
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Just think... a free hernia every time you pull out the chair! <GD&R> Tom
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wrote:

6" cross section is going to split- a lot. Oak is terrible for that. If you're willing to let them sit until they're dry, they might make good demi-lune table tops or something. If you're lucky, there will only be one big pie-shaped crack from the center to the edge, and you'll be able to simply cut the side opposite that, and come up with two nice chunks that are worth something as a table tops.
Whatever you do with it, that's a lot of oak- have fun!
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