Any tools still made in the USA?

Page 10 of 13  
On 10 Nov 2003, Bay Area Dave spake unto rec.woodworking:

Gesundheit.
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Clarifications:
"somebody's job" - US workers
"Those folks" - workers around the world.
dave
Bay Area Dave wrote:

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On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 02:28:23 +0000, snipped-for-privacy@SPAMLESSesperance-linux.co.uk (Frank Shute) wrote:
<snip>

Now there's a brand of a few Lie Nielson planes I'd like to own. Don't care where they are made, I still want them! But, first I need employment...still waiting for the last stage of recovery I guess.
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Frank Shute wrote:

Some of us questioned the motives from the beginning.

With manufacturing gone and farming gone, one wonders how will will earn the money needed to buy all these things from overseas.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 11:12:11 -0500, Silvan wrote:

Sure but from what I read the number is growing.

It won't go entirely, it will just downsize. To buy things from abroad to meet demand, you're already expanding the national debt ie. borrowing from foreigners.
Eventually foreigners will suspect that you can't service that debt/your economy is in trouble and stop buying treasury bonds. I don't expect the US will end up a basket-case like Argentina though ;) Expect further devaluation of the dollar and a medium to long term rise in unemployment.
What worries me is social anarchy in the US. The imbalance between rich & poor seems set to widen, yet you can't keep a lid on that forever by just throwing the dispossessed into prison when they try and restore some balance by wielding their 45s.
If I lived in the US, I'd be looking to sell up & move abroad whilst the going is fairly good & the dollar is still worth something.
--

Frank


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Lawsuit.

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Not much these days. Cheaper labor overseas and rising costs across the board in the USA take care of that. Every country goes through this to a certain extent. From agricultural, to industrial, and I suppose now service or information. Same thing's happening to Japan and even Taiwan. If it helps any, US companies are probably making more money, it's just going to the execs and owners.
I like to buy US when I can, but it's not a huge deal for me as long as it's a good product. I've had Chinese and Taiwanese no-name tools that were beyond useless, and then a lot of my nice Porter-Cable and Milwaukee stuff is made in the same places. My DeWalt cordless drills are USA with Japanese batteries.
Buy used if you want really nice stuff. Old Delta, P'matic, and General iron is a good value.
GTO(John)

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Not many, costs too much to produce them here, plus, if you make a tool to last a long time then you can't sell many of them. Have you noted that cars last until you make your last payment, then fall to pieces? We are digging ourselves into a huge hole.
Brian Elfert wrote:

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If you're a grandpa, you must remember the three-year vehicle. So you've picked a bad example, in my opinion. I'm _glad_ they don't make 'em like they used to. I'm running about eight/ten years in salt country right now, and 150K+, which was unheard of when I was a kid.
As to manufacturing, might I submit:
Foundry/factory puts out smoke, noise, uses up resources. NIMBY!
Got to let people who hate what I stand for as an owner "organize" in my plant. They risk nothing, I everything to start it.
Have to be a good corporate citizen and pay more taxes even if it bankrupts me. I don't get to define citizenship, either.
Oh yes, conspiracy theories aside, the money _isn't_ in making 'em, but selling 'em.
"Grandpa" <jsdebooATcomcast.net> wrote in message

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Cars are much better now. Minnesota used to be the land of the rust bucket. Now, in general, more cars succumb to accidents than to rust. I rarely see a rust bucket anymore unless it is pretty old like 1980s vintage.
Brian Elfert
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Brian Elfert wrote:

Thats probably due to better paint and undercoats, not the mechanical side of the vehicle, unless its dying before it has a chance to rust.
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Wrong all the way. From engine through galvanizing through suspension, the cars are built better. You're one of the few who would contest that. 100K used to be an old car. Now it's middle-aged.
"Grandpa" <jsdebooATcomcast.net> wrote in message

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And why do you think that is? Do you think that the American car manufacturers did that of their own accord?
Volkswagen started the trend for quality in this country...back in the early 60's. The U.S. car makers HAD to jump on the band wagon...so they finally started makin' economical cars.
International competition is a good thing. And, for the most part in this modern world...its unavoidable.
Many so-called 'foreign' products are built in the U.S...and the reverse is also true.
Is Honda a foreign product? Is Chrysler an American product?
Have a nice week...
Trent
Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity!
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I'd almost agree, except that most tangible improvements in safety, fuel economy and such were the result of Congress, not Detroit. If it were up to the idiots in Detroit, they'd still be selling steel dashboards, non-collapsible steering columns, cars that disintegrate on impact (compare damage on regulated cars to unregulated light trucks - 5mph collision costs a couple of hundred in a car, a couple of thousand in an SUV) and so on. They still don't get it, but get away with it because people buy into the dream, not the vehicle.
Mike
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On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 06:29:15 GMT, "Michael Daly"

Actually, I doubt if anybody in Congress has or ever had the knowledge or expertise to even ENVISION any of these improvements, Mike. Probably most of the ideas came from other countries...most notably Germany and England. Fuel economy for cars would still be a dream if it weren't for Volkswagen...and the subsequent imports from other countries.

Actually, cars are supposed to disintegrate on impact...to be safe. That's the principle behind it all. Just watch some of the wrecks on NASCAR, etc. When the car resists all that force, its your body that hasta take the blunt of it. Not good.
A good example...although not with cars...
I don't think Harley is building any bikes yet with air bags...or with ABS brakes. But their available in other countries.
International competition is a good thing.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity!
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The Europeans were doing little on pollution control. American and Canadian standards are still ahead of Europeans on clean air. No, Congress isn't capable of thinking - but the lobbyists were able to get them to enact the regulations. Environmentalists on clean air and fuel economy, insurance companies on collision costs and safety.

I didn't say crumple and absorb energy, I said disintegrate. Cars used to fall apart in a collision and leave the passengers to fend for themselves. Now we have collision energy absorption, reinforced passenger compartments, some roll-over strength etc. Most of that was imposed on Detroit, not done willingly. Light trucks are exempt from this and are not so readily equipped, nor do they stand up to collisions as well as one might expect given there considerable mass.
Mike
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On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 12:05:24 -0500, "George"

If you got 60M miles on a set of rings, you were lucky!
It use ta take 6 hours back then...to get an STP oil change! lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
Fighting for peace is like screwing for virginity!
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Grandpa <jsdebooATcomcast.net> wrote:

You are either financing your cars over longer than a 10 year period, abusing them, or buying crap.
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On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 09:36:26 -0700, Grandpa <jsdebooATcomcast.net> wrote:

Ah, my Japanese car is over 20 years old. My brother always buys American cars, but buys a new one every three years because they keep falling apart. He makes more money than I do.
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We need to send all those Chinese jobs....too Mexico...so they can stay home.......

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