Any tools still made in the USA?

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Andy Dingley wrote:

Back when I used to make a lot of money as a software programmer, I knew it was a short-term jig. Much of what I spent time doing was trivial, repetitive, and essentially useless.
I have a book titled "Bus Maintenance" from the 1920's. Lots of mechanics were employed in those days fixing problems many people today haven't seen a single example of -- like broken axles. I bought my first home/business computer in 1983. From the mid 1980's to the .dot com crash I fixed a lot of software broken axles. The basic engineering has improved in both cases so you don't need a room full of people. Toyota's don't (as a rule) break their axles; connecting PCs on a network doesn't "break their axles" anymore either.
Much of the .com boom was the incompetent doing the unnecessary for the unrealistic, with the net result of inconsequentiallty.
-- Mark
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On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 00:55:02 GMT, "Mark Jerde"

8-)
I did fairly well on the dot.com boom (but nothing like as well as some). Now I'm chasing work that isn't there, for rates that are somewhere near they were 15 years ago, and less than half I was getting two years ago.
I'm old. I was doing this stuff _long_ before the dot.com thing, and I'm good at it (if I go to an overseas conference, it's because I'm an invited speaker). But there's a horde of mid-20s dot-com idiot Nathans out there who think they know it all, yet will now work for peanuts. It's very hard to find work in this climate.
Even woodworking isn't paying. All I can get is minimum-wage labouring work. I can't even get a decent joinery job, because I'm not officially trained as a toobefour chopsaw merchant. Then I come home to my own workshop and agonise over the accuracy of my 17th century sandarac varnish formulation, or the exact proportions of a Greene & Greene bridle joint. The only option seems to be selling my own work, but that's fighting against Ikea's pricing and I really _don't_ want to run a business (BTDT, hated it).
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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wrote:

Try building furniture with bellbottoms...
-Jack "Trying to be helpful here"
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JackD wrote:

LOL! I was in high school in the 1970's. I'd still wear bell bottoms if they were available!
-- Mark
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Mark Jerde wrote:

Where have you been for the last few years? They're everywhere. They're called "flared leg jeans" this time around, and I've only seen them available in styles aimed at women, but if you're that much into the hideous things, maybe you don't mind wearing hip huggers.
(Hip huggers are evil. They do absolutely nothing except make even the best-formed ladies look chunky.)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Silvan wrote:

The style I like use contrasting material for the "vee" and the bottom of the "bell." Haven't seen any of those since "Mod Squad" reruns were taken off... <g>

Sorry sir, I disagree. <g> Some of my favorite memories of high school (in the 1970's) involve hip huggers. ;-)
-- Mark
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ued to wear those in high scholl. Hrd to get where I was (Japan). My mother made them.

(in
No doubt. You've got to consider though, Silvan's just a kid :)

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Mark Jerde recalls:

Soom of my favorite memories of the '60s and '70s involve micro mini skirts.
Charlie Self
"Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfils the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things." Sir Winston Churchill
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Yeah, I still remember those Jello commercials.... <eg>
-- Mark
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Charlie Self wrote:

That was when pumping gas was a GREAT job!
Scott
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Note that the mini was the skirt of choice well into the eighties in Cuba, because of the shortage of cloth. Women who didn't wear 'em, and there were some who should have worn full length and better, were considered unpatriotic.
Pumping _gas_ never was great, but I did enjoy pumping Ethyl....

skirts.
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Andy Dingley writes:

Well, then...I'm working on a couple books, but, like you, I had no intention of going back in business, at least full-time, again, until Ms MBA changed my mind abruptly (after helping force me to shear off the old ties a few months earlier).
So, what the hell. This WV/retail writer (that's a joke, but I didn't know it until too late) adventure cost me enough so retirement is out of the question for now, but at least I've still got a marketable skill, though it's difficult to implement some parts of it in a garage workshop with a single 115 volt circuit.
Come spring, go house, get my tail back to VA and a full-sized shop and really wind things up. Unless someone wants to buy a small (1550 square feet) house on a tiny lot in a dying town right NOW!
Charlie Self
"Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfils the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things." Sir Winston Churchill
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Mark Jerde wrote:

That's a really good analogy.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Andy Dingley wrote:

I hear you guys (by way of the BBC World Service) frequently talking about the glory days of the Britsh Empire with a combination of nostalgia and the pragmatic realization that those days are forever relegated to the pages of history.
I'm feeling the same about the US, so it's funny you should put my feeling into words so succinctly. We're losing the limelight, and the empire is collapsing. I don't know if it will be China's century, or the EU's, but I fear it won't be America's.
I'm thinking what will make or break us will be the space race to Mars. Whoever gets there first gets the stage, and at this point it's likely that the first human language spoken from the surface of the red planet will not be English.
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Why in the world would you think that a major war could possibly last long enough today for anyone's production capacity to much enter into the equation? Who are we going to fight with Tanks and major firepower that are big enough to A) keep us from getting resupplied B) cause us to use up our existing weaponry and C) wouldn't rather quickly escalate into a major mushroom event? A major war that would be a slow starter like WWII that would allow time for us to build lots of weapons like we did in WWII is not the least likely. Oceans aren't going to protect us like they did then, enemys big enough to keep us away from existing suppliers aren't going to be incapable of bringing the war to us like in WWII. I don't think war preparedness is a valid argument against free trade - although there are many valid arguments against it ( just as there are many valid arguments for it).
Dave Hall
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Did you hear about the senator who carries a Green Beret that is made in China? Pretty damn pitiful..... Look at American flags to see where they are made. I have seen some MIC (made in China).
Charlie Self wrote:

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Wasn't the Army going to buy a bunch of foriegn made berets until too many people complained? Apparently, there are so few American clothing producers left that they couldn't an American firm to produce them quickly enough.
Brian Elfert
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nospam wrote:

After September 11th China made a fortune knocking out extremely crappy American flags.
The one I fly was made in the USA, FWIW.
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On 10 Nov 2003 21:35:06 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Exactly.
The Japanese have long contended that we should become an agricultural entity, and do what we do best - consume mass quantities of the world's resources in exchange for all of our wealth.
We are well on our way with 10mpg SUVs and poorly built $250,000 homes that rot into the ground in 15 years.
Greg
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Meanwhile, the Japanese are turning out nice little hybrids that get 50 MPG. I guess Bush thinks it's OK to churn out 10 MPG SUVs because somebody's gotta buy all that Iraqi oil which Halliburton and Bechtel are getting rich on. And once he finishes dismanteling what's left of the EPA, Detroit won't have to worry about those pesky fleet mileage goals anymore, right?
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