Any tools still made in the USA?

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I found this interesting, from an article by Robert Reich....
America has been losing manufacturing jobs to China, Latin America and the rest of the developing world. Right? Well, not quite. It turns out that manufacturing jobs have been disappearing all over the world. Economists at Alliance Capital Management in New York took a close look at employment trends in 20 large economies recently, and found that since 1995 more than 22 million factory jobs have disppeared.
In fact, the United States has not even been the biggest loser. Between 1995 and 2002, we lost about 11 percent of our manufacturing jobs. But over the same period, the Japanese lost 16 percent of theirs. And get this: Many developing nations are losing factory jobs. During those same years, Brazil suffered a 20 percent decline.
Here’s the real surprise. China saw a 15 percent drop. China, which is fast becoming the manufacturing capital of the world, has been losing millions of factory jobs.
see the whole thing at: http://www.tompaine.com/feature2.cfm/ID/9322 to e-mail, remove 'nojunk' from e-mail address
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On 11 Nov 2003 14:55:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnojunk (Eric G.) brought forth from the murky depths:

-snip-
One word explanation: AUTOMATION.
A friend of mine is automating small companies along the California I-78 corridor and estimates that the companies he works for are removing between 4 and 12 people/jobs per line he installs.
---------------------------------------------------------------------- * Scattered Showers My Ass! * Insightful Advertising Copy * --Noah * http://www.diversify.com ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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General makes a 15" bandsaw in North America (Canada) that's well regarded.
They also have a imported line that comes from the far east.
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Blame the Unions!!
Years ago when there was not much government regulations, companies could do and treat people anyway they wanted. Unions then helped people.
Education, regulations, and the workplace has gotten 10x better and safer. Now companies spend billions either paying extra $$'s because of unions, or spending the money keeping a union out.
I have worked across the US in manufacturing and have found the quality of union work to be worse than non-union work. Union workers are not motivated like non union workers are.
I have worked union and non-union contractors on the same job and the nonunion contractor does equal or better work and is much more flexible.
Why an educated worker needs someone to represent them, I don't know or understand.
What I do know is that companies closing their doors and moving their operations to Mexico or China, are mostly union based companies.
In my own company we have union and non union plants. Those plants that are non union are consistently more productive, efficient, have less waste, and are more engaged than the union plants.
Unions are a real waste to our economy.
If you are in a union, ask yourself why it is that you need someone to represent you and when your company moves operations to the south, Mexico, or China, how much you got in that last strike helped that company make that decision.

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On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 02:52:30 +0000, John wrote:

Obviously this is a person who has never looked beyond the end of his nose toward politics, human rights, nor the good of workers and communities. I have a union job. It pays much better than the last nonunion job I had. I have good health insurance, a retirement plan, and can take a couple of weeks per year to spend time with my family on a vacation. Many companys have unions because, in the past, the company DID treat people any way they wanted and could do anything they wanted. You readily admit that unions have helped people in the past. Unions are still helping people, more than ever before.
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Blame it on the greedy executives!!!
wrote:

real
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LOL, Actually, you can blame it on both.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving

"Tony" < snipped-for-privacy@esper.com> wrote in message
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Did anyone answer Brian's original question without going into a union/non-union tirade ?
Thanks ! Jerry

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Actually, the union/non-union tirade did answer it and the answer for all intents and purposes is no.
--
If at first you don't succeed, you're not cut out for skydiving


"JAW" < snipped-for-privacy@noserver.com> wrote in message
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On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 13:17:34 +0000, JAW wrote:

After getting involved in the union side of this issue I think I should answer this one also. Yes, there are many tools still made in the good ole USA. For hand tools, the first that comes to mind is SnapOn. They are high priced but top notch for quality and service. For the mechanics that do not need the SnapOn experience Craftsman brand hand tools are also made in USA. As for power tools, several companies that come to mind are Delta, Dewalt, Porter Cable and Powermatic. While they also have manufacturing plants in other countries (as well they should because they market to other countries too) their top of the line tools sold in the USA are made in the USA. I even saw Hobart welders (made in USA) on the shelf at Harbor Freight the other day. There are many good tools to choose from. When I need something for a weekend project any tool that gets the job done is fine. But for my job I need tools I can depend on. I want something that is good quality, built here and serviced here by technicians who have parts readily available. I definitely look for the Made in USA label.
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IIRC, Dewalt closed all of their US factories and is producing everything in Asia.
Jon Dough wrote:

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On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 13:17:34 +0000, JAW wrote:

Of course the easy way is to check www.buyamerican.com!
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Interesting. According to them, Porter-Cable and Makita (among others) make tools in America.

-- jc Published e-mail is strictly for spam collection. To e-mail me, use jc631 at optonline dot net
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John Carlson writes:

Porter-Cable probably still does some here. Makita has long made small tools, especially cordless, in, IIRC, a SC plant. (Might have been in Georgia--that was a second year of tool company tours and some of them got scrambled in my mind.) Toured it once a number of years ago. Impressive facility. At that time, DeWalt was running an almost as impressive line in Towson, MD. That went offshore, along with 1100 or more jobs.
Lots of changes in the industry in the past 5 years, with more and more companies offering tools, with the tools being more and more alike, especially at the cheap end of the scale, and almost all low end to middle range, and some high range, tools now being manufactured elsewhere.
The jump in profit margins must be enormous because in many cases, prices are maintained while production costs are cut by 50% or more.
Charlie Self "Brevity is the soul of lingerie." Dorothy Parker http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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In the area of manufactured goods, it is almost impossible to talk meaningfully about a "American company" or "made in America" products. Many of the companies that have been traditionally based in the US have become multi-nationals with global operations, often manufacturing the same or similar products in a number of countries. For years, it was common for Asian car companies to import vehicles without back seats so that they would be taxed at the lower truck rates, then bolt in a back seat and sell it as a car. Consumer electronics devices might have all the electronic portions built outside the US then inserted into cases to be sold here.
This whole discussion is quite meaningless. What we should do is be informed consumers and look for quality and value in whatever we buy, no matter whot he manufacturer is or whether the company is based in the US or not.
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I wholeheartedly agree. Buy the best quality and it's up to the company, American or other, to earn that reputation. Buying American striclty 'cause it's American allows the company to get lazy and depend on blind loyalty rather than having a good product.
However, when a company has established a (good) reputation and then moves production to an el cheapo place, (and deoesn't even drop prices), what happens to the quality (and soon thereafter, reputation) of that compnay?
I mean Delta is a great example. Why on earth would I buy a new DJ20 jointer now - it's made in Taiwan. Is the price lower - no. Is the quality questionable - in my mind, yes.
Renata
wrote: --snip--

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Where did you think the tool was made prior to Taiwan ???
PS:
It was never made here.
Renata wrote:

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Where? (Canada counts as 'murica).
Renata
On Wed, 07 Jan 2004 16:11:48 GMT, Pat Barber

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Because it's Delta or because it's made in Taiwan? <g>
dave
Renata wrote:

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I kinda like my old 50's vintage DELTA Unisaw, so it ain't cause it's a Delta.
Renata

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