Any thoughts "window trim"

Well I bought and installed a 35inch wide..by 46 high Anderson Arch window...and need to finish the inside with interior window trim.. I could purchase direct from Anderson but the price was a bi prohibitive..so Im thinking of making the trim myself using a router .I dont have access t a band saw.... So Im going to try to use a router on an arm for cutting a 35 inch diameter curve...
Im thinking f using Red wood or cedar...for the trim... suggestions..thoughts?
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I think I would cut thin strips and bend them to fit. Build up until you have the thickness/look you like.
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elliot wrote:

Make a pattern from MFD or hardboard. Carpet tape the pattern to the blank. Rough it out, within 1/16", with a jigsaw or coping saw. Use a bearing guided straight bit to finish. Add thin strips with a shaped face (think "cockbeading") to the edges to create relief and interest. You can easily rout flutes to the face by making a curved edge guide.
If you're painting it, the main "board" can be birch ply, or if fluted, MDF.
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On Wed, 21 Nov 2007 13:36:31 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (elliot) wrote:

Barry's method (make a pattern first) is the way I usually do them. I have cut the radius on the piece directly but with a hardwood it can be a challenge. Since you're going with either redwood or cedar it might not be too bad and a couple of passes for each radius will probably do it. Remember, you will have two different radius cuts to make. Also the IR will cut from one side of the cutter and the OR will cut from the other. So, if your IR is 35 add the width of the finished trim plus the diameter of the cutter to 35 to get the OR. Now you have two holes in your router jig and you want to pivot both from the same point.... if that makes any sense.
Mike O.
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And add an 1/8" to 1/4" reveal to the inside radius. The casing shouldn't be flush with the jamb/extension.
R
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To all:
Yes it does make sense and I appreciate the advice.. and re IR and OR thats an issue Im working on...when I set up the jig fpor this..probably after Xmas as travel and family plans set my schedules.
Im thinking of buying a new Router and considering one that drops down or raises and lowers,,....sorry..my ability to recall the correct name is simply fading with the years..
any reason to generally spend the extra money...?
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On Fri, 23 Nov 2007 15:58:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (elliot) wrote:

I think you mean a plunge router base. I have both PC and Bosch routers and plunge bases for each brand. While I rarely need the plunge base, there are times that I'm very happy to have them. If you watch for the sales, you might find a price on the kit (2 bases) for not a lot more than just the router and standard base.
Mike O.
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What Mike said.
Most good brands (Bosch, DeWalt, Porter-Cable, Milwaukee, Makita, etc...) make 1-3/4 to 2-1/4 or so HP variable speed combo kits, and they're all comparably good. If you can get your hands on the different models locally, you may find a preference to one or the other, but you really can't go far wrong with any of them. This time of year, many of them include some sort of bonus, like an edge guide. The Craftsman 2 1/4 HP hit is a repackaged Bosch 1617EVS, so if you see it on super sale...
While 90% of your routing might be with the straight base, there are many useful operations where you simply need the plunge base. These operations include mortising, stopped grooves and dados, and hollowing.
Another useful feature on the plunge base is the stop turret. This allows the user to do the cutting operation in steps, without actually changing adjustments, for repeatability from part to part. A straight base is usually much easier to handle for edge routing, with a lower CG, which is why you wouldn't want only the plunge base.
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