Any Suggestions....Metal Rulers

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I suppose a scale could have just one set of ratios, but the ones all over my desk are triangular and have many ratios, in metric and in Imperial.
Taking info off drawings, as I often do, makes it obvious that the scale of drawings have lost a lot of accuracy over the years.
I have backwards traced why some of that happens. In the old days, a drawing was made to scale then copied 1 : 1 in a blue print machine. The scale remained intact. Now, with CAD generated drawings, the relative scale remains intact, but the absolute scale can vary quite a bit depending on the digitized version of the originals. I have a client who has his raster density set for his plotter, and he sends his files to me via e-mail where mine has a HP engine and his a Canon (300 basic DPI and multiples thereof vs 360 DPI) and sure-as-shit, his stuff is always off by 20%. My large format (bigger than C) plotter print shop always asks for a 50cm reference line so that my drawings are at least true to my manual scales. Architects have little problem with things like that, but the rogue "kitchen designer" who has bought a CAD package for a few hundred dollars are not to be trusted when it comes to scale.
And all along I thought that scale was what the union said what I should get paid for doing a gig. :)
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Leon wrote:

Nope, think architects or engineers rule--the three sided kind.
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Leon wrote:

As I recall, scales have incised lines for units and their divisions. These aid in setting dividers accurately. Drafters, machinists, and aircraft mechanics often use dividers, thus the preference for the term "scale", I suppose. Machinist and mechanic scales always include decimal divisions, but may only measure inches; those used by woodworkers often do not include decimal divisions. Nowadays many do have metric units along with inches (here in the U.S.), but many of my older ones (35+ years) only measure inches. And were called scales when I bought them.
Dale Scroggins
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No.

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Try to obtain a stick of 'Engraver's Black', something similar to the sticks of red sealing wax. Probably obtainable from a polish supplier.
I assume that the ruler should be gently heated and the stick rubbed over the gravings
Jeff G
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http://www.rulerco.co.uk/rulers/ruler.html This British company calls them "rulers". Under "metal rulers" you can see several examples of what I'm talking about.
http://www.generaltools.com/directory.asp?action=ppage&pnum )&sectionid=3 General tools calls them steel "rules". (Not surprisingly, neither of my two old examples are listed.)
http://www.stanleytools.com/default.asp?TYPE TEGORY&CATEGORY=MEASURING+TOOLS Stanley calls their steel tapes, "rules"
http://www.brownandsharpe.com/index.asp I have one example of a Brown and Sharpe , but apparently they no longer manufacture and steel rules or rulers, as the case may be.
(In searching some old attic boxes, yesterday afternoon, I happened upon a Brown & Sharpe #4 rule(r), in pristine condition. I have no idea where I acquired it. Double sided, it has four scales, graduated in 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 and 1/64's. It is heavy like steel, but has some type of anodized or brushed surface, and presents with a light gun-metal gray surface with black printing. It does not appear to be engraved.)
http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/tools.asp?tool=hand&Group_ID 20&store=snapon-store Snap-On tools refers to them as "steel rules" in their online catalog, but calls them "rulers" in their stock listings
http://www.gaebel.com/SSOneZ.htm Gaebel calls them "steel rulers"
http://www.dickblick.com/categories/rulers / I have a Fairgate 24" zero-center rule, that I use often. It says so right on it. However, on their WEB site, they are all referred to as "rulers"
http://www.draftingsteals.com/catalog-rulers---measuring-aides-aluminum-straightedge-rules.html Lufkin consistently refers to them a "rules" including the folding rules.
http://www.rhinotools.com/rhinoRulers.html Rhino consistently refers to both "folding rulers" and their steel tapes as "rulers"
http://catalog.starrett.com/catalog/catalog/groups.asp?GroupID !0 Starrett consistently refers to "rules" in all instances.
Phillip Stanley, in his "Source Book for Rule Collector" says that "rule" is proper in all instances, except for school "rulers"
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If there is a point to this, would you mind getting to it?
All you just proved is that there are others with bad language skills.
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Perhaps we should petition the Usenet Gods to change the name of the group to "rec.lexicology."
Mutt
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No - He (IMHO) defended your statement, by looking at both common usage and companies I consider to be authorities.
Look at those that say the proper term is "rule" and not "ruler":
General Stanley Lufkin Starrett
*I* consider (most of) these to be authorities. They probably made the "rule" you are using. And they *agree* with you.
I think you owe Amused an apology for backing up your claim with more than opinion, and doing it in a way that was polite and allows people to make up their own mind.
Thank you, Amused, for providing some facts and resolving the issue - in my mind. Or course, if you consider Rhinotools or The Ruler Company to be an authority, you may have a different opinion. That's okay as well.
We are allowed to pick those we consider to be authorities, and to make up our own mind based on that.
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I might consider that once I get an explanation why he felt the need to call me a schizophrenic with a skin condition after my making a comment on word usage.
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Bruce Barnett wrote:

Sure you are, doesn't mean you will be right. Toolmakers may well go along with a popular shift in language usage. Look to the practitioners of specific technologies for terminology. Some are a little arcane, but the terms are usually developed to avoid misunderstandings.
For example, people here often describe something using the terms front and rear of a table saw, which no one seems to agree on. Of course not, there is no front and not rear to a table saw, there is, however an infeed and an outfeed that is clear to anyone.
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That may be, but IMHO those that MAKE the tools can tell us what the proper name is.
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Bruce Barnett wrote:

Maybe? You sound like the idiot in the phone advertisement where he says he is sticking it to the man. Top, bottom, front, rear, left, right, etc. are often used as descriptors when they are inappropriate and meaningless to the item described. Now you be sure to hold the football with the left side nearest you.
The people that write the words (advertisements, instruction manuals, etc.) often don't know anything about the tool or how to use it, and the writers get confused and may make mix ups, especially if the writings are not reviewed by the real technicians. Hell, just think of all the silly and stupid mistakes you find in newspaper articles about something in your field of specialization.
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Best example I saw of that was some oil-absorbent material. It was not the usual kaolin, but some very light powder. The manufacturer claimed it was lighter than air. Even though I had no oil drips on the ceiling of my garage, I went ahead and bought it, confident that I could capture the package contents before they floated off, and force them down to the garage floor! <g>
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alexy wrote:

Har! :)
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Starrett sells rules. Stanley sells rules. They are allowed to tell us what the NAME of the product is. Who said anything about advertisements or instruction manuals? Sheesh!

I don't go around making up names for the products I buy. I can hear it now.
George: How do you like my new BMW? Fred: It says Hyundai. George: That's those writers they hire. They always get confused and mixed up.
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Bruce Barnett wrote:

Very interesting, have you had your meds for the day? Or do you always randomly mix up things?
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One can call day night and night day. That is a privilege accorded to those living in a free society. If you wish to know the true meaning of a word, there is one source, the Oxford English Dictionary.
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snipped-for-privacy@centurytel.net wrote:

I think a dictionary was one of the things I suggested, along with longtime tool makers and technical books on the techniques that use the tools
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I'll use small words for you. American rule makers have been using the same terms for 160 years. Stanley, Starrett, General and Lufkin all agree the proper term is "rule." Philip E. Stanley, who has familiarity with the Stanley family business, is an author of at least four books about this subject, also says th propr term is "rule."
You disagreed, and responded with

And then you accuse ME of getting confused? I'm not the one claiming that Stanley, etc. has been using the wrong term for 160 years, and that it was never EVER reviewed by "real technicians."
Stanley sells "rules" and has done so for more than 100 years. They MAKE the tools the technicians use. You can call it whatever you want, but that doesn't change the NAME of the product.
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