Any Solid Surface Guru's out there?

Howdy,     I'm manufacturing a hickory kitchen for a client and they want Hi- Macs solid surfacing for a countertop. I've got to build up the edge to 1 1/2" w/a 1/4" beveled edge top and bottom and mount an undermount stainless sink w/a nice faucet set-up bored thru the top.     I get the idea to rough sand mating parts for the glue to hook up, but after I rough saw the exposed edges what grits do i need to bring back the hi pro glow? Can I use an 80 tooth blade and expect to sand it clean or should I use the router and straightedge? I figger I'll start with 80, then 120 then 220. Is 220 going to cut it or should I proceed on up to say 320 then 600 or so?     On the undermount sink, should I build up to 1 1/2" then mount the sink or is 1" the standard? Bevel the top, bevel the bottom, glue and screw the sink in...?     Luckily enough this is a straight run, no joints to monkey with. I normally don't just up and do things without looking into it, but this seems pretty basic. Worst case scenario I'd have to sand my ass off. Won't be the first time for that either.     Anyone on the Rec. have much experience with this stuff?
Muchos grassyass, Russ P.
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You rough sand polyesters. HiMacs is an acrylic so their adhesive is a 'cohesion' process rather than an 'adhesion' one. If you rough sand, you will get white lines where the joints are. The thing to do with all quality acrylics, is to clean one edge (while still attached to the sheet) with a straight edge and router. Slow speed, Slow feed and a large straight bit. (1" or bigger) After you have that near-perfect edge... cut it ( 1-1/8" wide) off with a circular saw using same straight edge. Now flip the top over and cut a 1/8" x 9/16 rabbet on the bottom of the deck... nice and slow..(heat turns all that shit white) Clean everything with methyl Hydrate and a WHITE, lint-free rag. Run a bead of adhesive---- ( I assume you have the proper dispensing gun?)(Make sure you purge the gun and cartridge) ( Dispose of purged adhesive in a safe way...cuz the reaction can set that shit on fire)---- in the rabbet and stick on your edge (vertically) and use one 2" Pony spring clamp per 3" DO NOT overclamp, adhesive starvation is a bad thing. Clean up squeeze-out from behind the edge, but not the front (visible) edge. Make sure there is squeeze-out at the front. Don't get any adhesive on your fingers...burns and removes skin. Flip the top back over when the adhesive is set and trim with flush (bottom bearing bit) using the newly installed edge as a guide. Now do you bevels and sand.

Noooo.. start with 180 until uniform.. then go to 240.. then go to maroon Scotchbrite pad... all in a ROSander.

Undermounts go under the 1/2 deck...no build-ups. (I suppose you can..but shit, man.. you're making a lot of work for yourself) Finish with a tiny bevel. Now THERE you rough sand the bottom as you will be using silicone to mount the sink. Make sure you buy a sink which is designed for undermounting Solid surface. Keep the botton straight and crisp. Use the clamping technique suggested by the sink manufacturer.

Yup.
And if you're serious about this material... take a course at ISSFA. http://www.issfa.net /
Good luck. (PS..Samsung Staron used to publish a fabrication manual on-line..see if you can DAGS it..)
00
Rob
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wrote:

    Hmmm, Methyl Hydrate, that isn't available in the local hardware store is it? I've got lacquer thinner, mineral spirits and denatured alcohol in stock. I can get my hands on some toluol and maybe some methyl ethyl ketone.

    The proper dispensing gun? No! They want $170 for one. I tossed the mix in my caulk gun and drilled a hole in the end a dowel and hooked it onto the little crook handle on my caulk gun. Now as the resin is dispensed, the top catalyst tube dispenses at the same rate, and goes thru the static mixer just slick as s#&t.

    Cool.

    Woohoo! Seemed like a pain to build it up. I think I saw that on some DIY show.

    I am serious but not enough to pay $1300 for lessons and such. I think you hooked me up. I learn quick thru my own schol of hard knocks.

     I tried that but to no avail. I gotta say I ~really~ appreciate the pointers. Again muchos grassyass. Russ P.

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On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 22:32:58 +0000, Russ Penrose wrote:

Methanol, wood alcohol, MeOH, CH3OH
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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It is sometimes used as fuel as well. But NEVER use anything else but methyl Hydrate. Hardware and paint stores sell it.

LOL.. whatever works, dude! Cox makes a gun that sells for around 100 buckaroonies.

A couple of medium sized jobs, and you'll have that money back. A lot of manufacturers want to 'certify' the fabricator. The ISSFA method is the bulk of what they are after. Warranty issues and all that rot. It can be a very rewarding career path.
http://www.worldpanel.com/diamonitefab.htm has some info
There is a lot of stuff on woodweb.com as well.

00
Rob
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wrote:

    I wasn't aware of that. I used denatured alcohol. Everything seemed to hook up real good.

    I mighta gone for $100.. I charged the guy $300 for a day's work to manufacture and install the piece. Next time I'll add the $100 to the price and go for it.


    I prolly oughta get certified. I'm sure now that the GC I do a lot of work for finds out I'm willing to do solid surface, he'll get me more work like that.

    Thanks for the walk thru,     Russ P.

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