Any Saw Stop Owners

Page 6 of 8  


If you mean "several decades" as "very briefly", then yes.

Automatic front seatbelts, _or_ airbags, became mandated in 1988 or so. Airbags suck much less than automatic front seatbelts - the ones mounted to the doors were particularly useless, since if the doors popped open, just when you needed the seatbelt to keep you in the car, it wasn't there.

Well, if they get the technology solid, then let's talk. I'm not holding my breath.

You don't. But that's not in their business model, so they don't care.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Same way you do it with the expensive saw, only cheaper. Look around you at anything electronic, many appliances, etc. They are much cheaper now that the were some years ago. My first bedroom size 6000 Btu AC was over $150 40 years ago. Today I can buy one for $99. Standard features in an economy car today are better than luxury cars of the past.
Improved design, higher volume to justify new tooling and the price will come down quite a bit in a few years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Hinz said:

Although their initial marketing approach was a bit (!) antagonistic, our marketplace IS based on capitalism. This was a small group of individuals who wanted to make a few bucks on their idea. They initially approached other manufacturers and were turned down. Admittedly, I don't know the figures they requested for the license on their device - perhaps they were just to greedy. It's not even a new technology, per se - only it's application to tablesaws.
But Imagine the flack if you tried to deny Thomas Edison or Steven Jobs a profit on their 'inventions'.
FWIW,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, as in "free market". Make something good and people will choose to buy it. Not "make something not so good and force people to buy it".

How is that even related? Nobody forces you to buy GE lightbulbs, or Apple computers.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Hinz said:

It was derived from this statement, which was snipped:

Your comparison of mentalities implies that they should have donated the idea to the market in a good-will effort rather than obtain a patent and earn a profit. I doubt they have the resources of MB or Saab, or for that matter, Delta/Pentair - only an idea they wanted to capitalize on.
And no, I don't own one, and probably never will. And I agree that their marketing technique was heavy handed. Avarice rules - even under the guise of public safety.
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK, one of us is missing the other's point, and I'm not sure who. What I was trying to get at, is that Mercedes didn't then patent crumple zones and lobby the government to force all cars sold to have crumple zones. The effect would have been to force everyone to buy Mercedes cars. They didn't do that.

Yup. Luckily it wasn't mandated and we have the choice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hummm. The current guards on all TS's all look the same. I wonder why? Could it be because these safety decvces are mandated also befor many of us were around?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Were they?
--
The moral difference between a soldier and a civilian is that the soldier
accepts personal responsibility for the safety of the body politic of which he
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't know. That is why I was asking. Since most every saw has that inefficient design I suspect that it was. I have never seen a saw come with out that style guard. Even the Saw Stop has it IIRC.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon said:

Powermatic 66 has a different style design. ;-) I like it better than the clumsy things that come on the other saws.
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Different but basically the same. I was thinking that it was indeed different but it still comes up from the back and covers the blade. Can't be used when cutting dado's. I do see however that the newly designed saw comes with a riving knife.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon said:

OK, I see what you're after now. Since I don't feel the need to use a guard when cutting dados or using a sled, I hadn't thought of that aspect. But since dados are not through cuts, it would require an over-arm type, like the Beisemeyer and others - or an overhead mount. They're prolly never going to include those types as standard equipment.
But they should ALL include a pop-out riving knife that tracks the blade height.
FWIW,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
alexy wrote:

Having a tire blowout or getting wiped out by some airhead chatting on a cell phone while piloting her SUV 20 MPH over the speed limit is not in the same category as a usually self-inflicted wound at a table saw. While woodworking YOU are in charge of what you are doing. On the open road you are at the mercy of others, as well as a mechanical failure. I don't know of many (if ANY) finger loses due SOLELY to mechanical failure of a table saw. If I'm wrong, enlighten me. I'll stick with my Unisaw for now...
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Todd the wood junkie wrote:

I think it is unrealistic to expect any safety device to *prevent* accidents. Airbags, brakes, fire extinguishers--they all fail or go off prematurely under certain conditions.
A more realistic view is that the purpose of the sawstop is to reduce the likelihood/severity of accidental injury when flesh contacts the blade.
Viewed in this light, I think it's a great idea.
That said, I don't think it should be mandatory, and I don't think it's worth the current premium for myself as a hobbyist.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Snip

I think it is. It has its acute problem right now but that is to be expected. So far the problem is a nusence.
When needed

I bet Joe would beg to differ with you since the saw just saved one of his employees thumbs by working as advertised. If the safety feature never works correctly to prevent an injury again Joe is ahead of the game.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 14:22:09 -0600, with neither quill nor qualm,

He does, does he? (Get ready, Darwin.)
--
Action is eloquence. --William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Unless he's reproducing in an unexpected way, the loss of fingers isn't a Darwinistic event.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Upscale wrote:

Bookshelves, tables, desks...oh wait, did you mean they should have moving parts?
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Critical components in aerospace applications are required to be a LOT more reliable that a mere 99.9999%
I worked with a company that made internetworking backbone equipment. Our customers demanded a better level of reliability than that. And these devices are a LOT more complex than a Sawstop.
I have a 50 year old tractor that seems that reliable. And it sits on a very, very, old concrete pad that is at least 99.9999% effective and reliable.
I'm sure the Sawstop electronics and mechanism can be made reliable, however, if the fundamental concept is flawed, (ie, it cannot reliably discriminate between wet woood and dry hands) then it has a bigger problem)
In the event of spurious tripping, do they offer free cartridges and new blades forever? I could be interested then.
Barry Lennox
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Look into "6 Sigma" - here's a FAQ:
http://www.isixsigma.com/sixsigma/six_sigma.asp
to achieve 6 sigma quality, you need 3.4 defects per 6 million opportunities.
Thousands of businesses are using this data-driven methodology to improve quality and profit.
GE, for instance, claims to have saved $10 billion because of this. They really needed to, because their quality was low at the time. I heard of a story where some city was going to buy a $5 million generator, and when the boss found out that they were planning to by a GE generator - he said "No way. My wife bought a GE refrigerator, and it was a piece of crap."
--
Sending unsolicited commercial e-mail to this account incurs a fee of
$500 per message, and acknowledges the legality of this contract.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.