Any reason I shouldn't get a Performax 22-44?

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I don't know if this applies to the 22/44 model but it works like a charm on the 16/32. There were a couple of sites that had some good tips on these sanders a couple of years ago and this one is still up http://www.joewoodworker.com/performax.htm
Click on the Figure 1 for a better picture. I installed two nylon washers with the steel washers backing them up. Allows for a little "better feel" when you're sneaking up on that last thou. The alignment procedure works too but I modified it slightly to make it easier. Best that you just do it first - then it will be intuitive as to what works for you and what doesn't - adjust accordingly.
Glad the other info was of some value but please note that there are other good sandpaper manufacturers out there. Klingspor seemed to be a good value as well as a decent product to use on this sander. So buy a roll or two of some others and make your own comparisons for the work you typically do. Primarily, you need a paper that won't stretch when it gets hot and if you hit a pitch pocket when it is - that particular roll is toast is the wood from that point on is gonna be burned like you wouldn't believe. So look closely at your wood before sanding - just like you scan your rough sawn wood with a metal detector before you put it thru that planer - right? Yeah, I thought so.......;-)
Bob S.
writes:

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Then I order. When it arrives, I try to figure out where it should go. Hmmm, that might explain why I can't move in my gara....er shop. :)
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On a planer a light pass is 1/64". What constitutes a light pass on a drum sander?
Thanks, Wayne
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Wayne,
Less than 1/8th of a turn on the crank works for me - depending on the grit being used. The manual states that 1 turn of the crank = 1/16" (.0625") so that means a 1/8th turn is about 1/128" (.0078") which is about the max depth for the finest grit of 220 that you would want to use. You can easily burnish the wood with fine grit paper.
The manual has a lot of good information and although I couldn't find the exact manual for my model, this one is close:
http://www.wmhtoolgroup.com/partfiles/16-32%20Plus%20Owners%20Manual.pdf
The picture shows a dual-drum configuration (16/32 Plus model) which I don't have. Mine is a single drum. Not sure the picture they show for wrapping the drums with paper is even a 16/32 series but hey, it's their manual - they should know.
Bob S.
wrote:

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David wrote:

A good source of abrasives (all kinds) is Econ-Abrasives in Dallas. They have a web site but there is nothing there other than name & address; however, a call to 1-800-367-4101 or email to snipped-for-privacy@econ-abrasives.com will get you a catalog.
Sample prices (catalog 3-4 years old) for the 3" cloth rolls ("X" weight), grits 100-400 needed for my 16/32... 3" x 50 yards: $41.90 3" x 25 yards: $24.65 Coarser grits are slightly more. IIRC, I get about 10 wraps from 25 yards. Maybe it is 8, really haven't paid attention. ____________________

The reason that you'll need a sled is that there is some slack in the drive belt (a wide sanding belt) that moves the stock. Gotta be some slack else it wouldn't move.
The hold down rollers project a bit below the sanding drum and hold both stock and belt down; however, where there is no stock to provide pressure on the drive belt it will raise up a bit and contact the sanding drum. That is bad because it will mess it up and the drive belts are expensive! _____________________

Depends on several factors... 1. Drive speed (I usually use 50-60% of max, faster if boards are in the 3-4" width range) 2. Grit 3. Wood hardness 4. Depth of cut
I use mostly three grits... 1. #40 to rough surface stock. I can take 1/16 off a 10" oak board. 2. #80 - I usually decrease height in increments of 1/48" 3. #120 - ditto to #80
I also use (rarely) #180 but generally stop at #120. In the time it takes to change frits on the drum and run stock through I can use a finishing sander (starting with the same grit as was last used on the drum) to get to a smaller grit more easily. By the time I've used #120 on the drum the boards are flat and true, takes very little time with a finish sander. YMMV
One thing many are not aware of - it takes more than one pass at a given height setting to bring a board to that thickness. Either that or a *very* slow feed rate. When you get down to the short strokes, remove very little at once. ___________________

Yeah, granules of aluminum oxide make marks :)
OTOH, they are handy because they are easy to see on a board when looking at it with oblique light and you can easily tell when your orbital sander has removed them. ___________________
One more caveat: avoid resinous wood like southern pine - it will mess up a roll of abrasive in a hurry.
Last word...you are going to love - absolutely *LOVE* - a drum sander!!
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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dadiOH wrote:

Thanks for so much info! How long does it take for you to switch grits? I'd never use pine.
dave
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and then flattened them to 50 and 70 thousands of an inch. IT worked very well. Alignment of the drum to conveyor is critical at these thicknesses. max
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David wrote:

Gee, I've never timed it. Not long...unhook from right end, pull off and roll up, unhook other end, hook first end of replacement, rotate drum while keeping tension on sanding strip until all wound, hook right end. Maybe a minute? Minute and a half?
A couple of other points...
1. If the one you are thinking of purchasing is like the 16-32 the left roll clamp is just a clamp but the right one is *also* a tensioner. It is easy to do, hard to explain but once the strip is wound on the drum you release the right clamp with one finger and - while holding the clamp open - shove the tapered roll end into the slot. Once in, move your finger horizontally clockwise (viewed from right side) and *THEN* release the clamp. If you just release the clamp the tensioner won't work, all is explained in the manual.
Additionally, the taper of the sanding strip needs to be such that it does NOT fill the takeup slot completely else the tensioner can't take up slack as the roll stretches.
2. When you get the sander it will probably have at least one cut sanding strip with it. When that strip wears out, don't throw it away...use it as a template to cut new ones.
3. There is no problem if there are gaps between spiral sections of the sanding strip on the drum; however, NEVER let the spiral ride up on itself else you will burn the wood and get a glazed area on the sanding strip. If that happens, don't throw the strip away, just sand stuff in another area of the strip.
4. When you change sanding rolls, get in the habit of rewinding what you are taking off in the opposite direction as it was when you wound it on. Next time you use it it will be wound on oppsite to the first time and - assuming you tend to sand in one area of the drum (I do) - wear on the strip will be equalized.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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dadiOH wrote:

Great additional info! Thanks!
Dave
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