Any plans out there for a crosscut stop?

Hi
I have a radial arm saw and want to make an adjustable stop. I'm sure I could fugure one out but I wondered if anyone knew of any plans out there for a shop-built system?
TIA
Nicholas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
if I understand you correctly, I used to use a c clamp on the rail.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nicholas...
There're pictures of one I built at <http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/t-clamps.html (3rd and 4th photo down) - they aren't difficult to make and work well.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I mount my RAS at the end of a built in workbench so that the saw table lined up with the bench top. This gives me about ten feet of flat surface tot eh right of the blade. I then replaced the backstop board on the RAS with on that is six feet long, notched so that three feet of it extends over the workbench.
Since I have a table saw, I almost always keep the RAS set at 90 degrees and use it as a cutoff saw.
For repetitive cuts, I just clamp a small piece of scrap to the extended backstop. This work for up to four feet. Beyond that, I might clamp something to the workbench top.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Coincidently, in the checkout line at HD today I noticed there is a "tip" about how to build a simple, but well thought-out such a dealie in the March issue of American Woodworker,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Why "build" something so simple? I've done pieces, mitered and un, clamped to the fence, pieces clamped to the auxiliary table, even a brief fling with one of the "tip" types in a magazine which featured a T and jam nut and bolt for microadjustablity. Waste of time.
Only thing you need to remember is if the stop is close to the blade, provide dust relief.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We manufacture walk-in-coolers for grocery stores etc., where I work, with 2x4 frames. Several hundred 2x4's get crosscut every week. They use a 12' length of 3/4 black iron pipe with a stationary end of a pony (pipe) clamp on the pipe. The pipe sits on top of the cutting stop (or backsplash area). They back up the pony clamp with a pair of visegrip round jaw pliers. Secure the pipe well so it can't move. I see them slam 2x4's into this thing all day long, and it doesn't move a 1/64 of an inch. I work in the service department know, but when I have worked in mfg. it always worked well. Hope this helps. Lyndell

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.