Any Comments on Rigid Palm Sander

I have been using a Makita and Dewalt "sheet palm sanders. They both work well but the dust collection system is not all that good. The switches are working but at time I need two hands to turn the power on or off. The Rigid "sheet palm sander appears to have an improved dust bag that can be hook to a standard vacuum hose and the switch can be turned on and off with one hand. I wonder if someone already have a Rigid and can comment on it. TIA
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When my nephew needed a sander to renovate his house (read strip all of the siding, ceilings and wall board, treat for termites, replace major portions of framing, wallboard, windows and doors...) we picked out the Ridgid sander for his use. It was orange, had a longish warranty, was on the shelf, and Robatoy had said good things about it. Tony abused it for a year, working on his place, and it still works pretty well today. The house looks a lot better, too.
For that level of investment, it seems a pretty good deal. Were I to replace one of my sanders today, I'd buy orange.
Patriarch
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Do you have a 5" ROS? Once you use one, you'll never pick up that palm sander again.
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Consider the PC SpeedBloc. Old design that has not been changed much in 20+years. Mine lasted 15 years and I replaced it with the same.
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On Wed, 20 Dec 2006 20:39:11 -0600, "Leon"

It's weight is an advantage when sanding horizontal surfaces, but I've found it too heavy and the grip too large to hold comfortably to use on vertical surfaces. I would advise getting whatever feels good in your hand.
-Leuf
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Unless you have a really good reason for using a 1/4 sheet sander, and I can't imagine what that might be, you should get a ROS instead. I just sold my 1/4 sheet sander because I hadn't used it in 2 years.

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Unless you have a really good reason for using a 1/4 sheet sander, and I can't imagine what that might be, you should get a ROS instead. I just sold my 1/4 sheet sander because I hadn't used it in 2 years.
Your comment is well taken. I have use electrical ROS to remove paint on fibreglass boat. After two days of continuous use it stop working. I then returned it to get my money back. Then I bough a pneumatic powered ROS to finish the job. I soon learned that the pneumatic is a far better tool. Why I do not use it anymore? It is because of the operating cost and flexibility. The cost of one 5" dia. sanding disk is around 0.38 to 0.60. While the cost of a sheet sand paper is (8x11 sh't /4) 0.60 / 4 = 0.15 or at time less. When finishing or refinishing furniture a 5" disk does not go into corners a sheet does. I can use a sh't palm sander with one hand whether I am under the hull of my boat or on a table top. The 5" ROS appears to remove material faster. However with the proper no-fiil and correct grit of sand paper the sh't sander is not too far behind at a lower cost of operation. In comparison (top of the line sanders) the 5" ROS works at 12500 OPM vs. the sh't palm sander at 1400 OPM. Having said that It does not mean that I will not buy of use a 5" ROS. It becomes a matter of picking the right tool for the job.

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Precisely.

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snipped-for-privacy@nb.sympatico.ca wrote:
> Your comment is well taken. > I have use electrical ROS to remove paint on fibreglass boat. After two > days of continuous use it stop working. > I then returned it to get my money back.
You need to blow the dust out of any electrical tool used on a fiberglass boat at least once a day if you expect it to survive.
As far as cost is concerned, my cost for 6" ROS discs, even 40 grit, is less than $0.25 each when purchased in lots of 100 pieces.
You need to find another supplier.
Lew
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For starters, how about sanding into drawer corners, cabinet corners, or the edge of 1/2" thick material with out rounding the edges.
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I have never had a problem with edges. It will not get into corners, but that is what a multimate is for. It gets into corners better than a 1/4 sheet sander. And yes, the supplies cost more. If you time is valued at $2/hour, the 1/4 sheet is probably the right choice; that would be an exception to what I said.
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My time is often worth $40 or more, down from when I made my living in the automotive industry. I have been using a ROS and a PC SpeedBloc finish sander since 1989. Recently I added the Fein Multimaster a very veritable tool. I would never want to be with out a finish sander, at least the SpeedBloc finish sander. The Speed Bloc would probably give most ROS sanders a run for their money.
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Leon wrote:

I'm not saying a palm sander is a bad tool or anything.. But don't you sand all pieces before assembly? That makes things a lot easier..
As far as sanding between coats of poly, I've had best results from just using a hand sanding block.
Basically, I never have to sand into a corner.
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Yes, I do sand some pieces before assembly, SOMETIMES. If I want a dado joint to fit as intended I usually sand last, that makes things fit a lot better. I have a pretty effecient routine down after 30 years. ;~)

I use 0000 steel wool or a 3M scotch brite pad if anything at all.
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BTY, I posted pictures of a display case on a.b.p.w. It has 16, 1/4" radius quarter round moldings and a bunch of 1/4" radius corners. Those would be tough to sand with a ROS.
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On Fri, 22 Dec 2006 23:13:34 +0000, Leon wrote:

Be tough with any kind of sander except the Porter Cable detail sander, which isn't all that great a sander, but will handle 1/4" radius inside and outside.
--
--John
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When making furniture all pieces of wood are surface planed and do not require sanding. The finish obtained is made be removing only thin shaving at a time on the planer. Once the pieces of wood are assembled together with joinery, glue and mechanical fasteners excess glue is removed. The bonding residue is removed according to the type of glue. With epoxy acetone is used and with carpenter exterior glue water is used. As water rises the grain a light sanding is done most of the time manually or with a steel scrapper or wool. When the situation calls for more than that a palm sander is used progressively with 180, 220 and 320 grit. The final sanding is determined by the nature of the wood. As an example pine, maple and oak do not require the same sanding approach.
Where the palm sander is widely used is for furniture refinishing. I have just completed refinishing all our solid oak kitchen cabinets including the doors and drawers. BTW our kitchen is 12' X 24'. To do so I used metal/carbide scrapers, palm sanders, hand sanding and steel wood. When I want to remove material fast I use the belt sander. With this belt sander you have to move it all the time otherwise you will dig in to the wood fast. Even now for fast material removal, on small job, I use the palm sander with a no-fill sand paper of 60, 80 to 100 grit. I am sure that other people have better procedures then mine. But these are the one I have used with proven results for years.

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OK, The PC Speed Bloc is a palm/finish sander.

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I never said I was to never use an ROS again. After reading your post I am musing about it.

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I have and use both a 1/4 sheet sander and 5" ROS sander. I started out with just the ROS, but picked up the 1/4 sheet for the following reasons:
o)    To have another sander ready to go with a different grit of paper all ready loaded.
o)    To handle corners and such that a round ROS sander can't get into.
o)    To be able to use finer grits of paper than are typically available in the hook/loop variety. Typically the finest grade of 5" hook/loop that's easy to get is only about 220. If there are finer grits out there, it's not something that can be purchased during a quick trip to one of the big box stores. However 320 grit and and sometimes higher are available in full sheets at the big box stores or at auto parts stores, which can then be cut down to 1/4 sheets sizes. Typically, I use the 1/4 sheet sander with 320.
o)    With 320 grit in the 1/4 sheet, I use it as a last pass to smooth things out before finishing and also to potentially get rid of any swirly marks that might have been created by the ROS.
Typically I'll run through 80, 100, 150 and 220 in the ROS where I can quickly change sanding discs and then finish up with the 1/4 sheet and 320.
If I was only going to have one sander, it would be the ROS with a variety of hook/loop discs as it's fast and easy to switch grits. But having both the ROS and the 1/4 sheet is better since it provides the ability to use finer grits that typically aren't available in hook/loop discs.
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