Anvil (found)

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A 100# anvil with "England" and "JB" cast on it will be auctioned locally at an estate auction house tomorrow. My online "research" indicates the JB stands for John Brooks and that it made before WW-II. I think it is in "good" condition. I assume an anvil worth shipping from England is probably a decent anvil...
I'll report the selling price tomorrow (for the sake of anyone who is interested)! Any hints on what a fair bid would be? I'd enjoy getting it for less than a fair bid! : )
Bill
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On Wed, 18 May 2011 01:57:58 -0400, Bill wrote:

If it is in good condition, $5.00 to $7.00 a pound.
basilisk
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basilisk wrote:

By good, I meant in between fair and very good. So to me your price sounds pretty steep--but I'm off to go find out. Thanks,
Bill
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On Wed, 18 May 2011 08:18:39 -0400, Bill wrote:

no argument from me, it is steep, but consider that there hasn't been a proper anvil made in the US for over 50 years and never will be again.
Depending on who shows up at the sale you may get it for next to nothing, all the better.
basilisk
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On 5/18/2011 7:42 AM, basilisk wrote:

I have a farrier's anvil I bought new in 1972 that has always done exactly what it was intended for. What would make it more proper?
Not arguing, just wondering ...
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On Wed, 18 May 2011 12:09:45 -0500, Swingman wrote:

A good anvil will have a cast semi steel base and a slab of high carbon tool steel forge welded to the top.
That combination will provide good rebound and make for a long life anvil that will survive even heavy work.
Rebound is essential to keep from wearing the smith out.
A cheap cast anvil will cover most of what people need to do these days but someone making forged knives or handmade wrought iron work in volume would need better equipment.
basilisk
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basilisk wrote:

If such an anvil were not painted, would this division be visible (if so, it may be a helpful way for those of us who are novices to discriminate between anvils)?
Bill

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I bought it from a farrier supply in OK when I attended Bud Beaston's Oklahoma Farriers College after getting out of the service in 1972, and used it to shoe horses full time for the next six years, and well after that for our own horses. I pounded lots of hot iron during that time doing gaited horses and later found it easier to use than my paternal, blacksmith grandfather's anvil from the turn of the century. Had a chance to change but liked the feel of the newer one better ( and of course it was a different shape), it weighs about 85lb, about 20 lbs lighter. I suspect it is a good anvil (it was their top of the line at the time, not cheap ... The Festool of it's class, IIRC. :>) ) Dad still has it and uses it on occasion but I haven't laid eyes on it, or thought about it, for a good twenty five years. Next time I go up, I'm going to check it out.
Thanks for the impetus, and memories ... :)
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That reminds me of the "anvil" I inherited from my father. It was a foot long piece of railroad track. I still use it on occasion when I need an unwielding surface to hammer on.
It also does dual duty at Christmas time. Several times I've put it in the same box with some small Christmas present. It's always good for a laugh watching someone trying to pick the box up.
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As a kid, I was a blacksmith's helper. I am talking about 7-8 yrs old. The blacksmith in question was a client of my dad's firm and he always got a kick out of my curiosity. Most of the 'work' was wire-brushing grates out of coal-burning space heaters and sweeping. On a lucky day, I would get to watch him putting new shoes on a horse and if I was really lucky, one of those horses would be huge and would be wearing socks (or so I was told). In retrospect those must have been Belgians. I would always cringe and worry about the hot shoes hitting the hooves...and that smell.. I will never forget that smell. The shop was old school back then. Bellows and a huge anvil. He'd start 'smithing' by bouncing the hammer on the anvil then hit the work piece and then bouncing on the anvil again, to keep it going. (I thought he was missing all the time...) Definitely one of my better memories. One horse, called Vesuvius, had an ass so big, it almost completely darkened the shed's door.... and when it took a piss, you better stand waaaay back.
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On Wed, 18 May 2011 15:38:03 -0700, Robatoy wrote:

My Grandfathers brother was a blacksmith and mechanic, he was uptown with a hand crank blower for the forge, powering the blower and the hand crank drill press were my duties.
There was no such thing as scrap iron in his hands, everything could become something useful.
I wish that he had remained healthy enough and lived long enough for me to have learned more of the craft and its finer points.
basilisk
--
A wink is as good as a nod to a blind horse

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I did learn from this guy. His favourite saying was: (and I translate loosely) "When it needs to be done and I have done it, I'm done." Simple, really.
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A "Good" anvil will have been forged from a solid billet of iron or steel - virtually unbreakable (A plate of tool steel may, however, be welded on the top). Others are cast and have a greater propensity to fracture.
The ones linked to by Casper are cast, however, knowing Vaughans, they are of decent quality. How long Vaughans will last is debatable. Hope works used to be huge but the last time I was across there their operation had shrunk down to one bay, still pretty big, but were down to only two or three employees.
Avoid chinese cast anvils like the plague, they are rubbish, usually known in the UK as "Aero anvils" after the chocolate bar. They have voids and bubbles due to included air or gas. The test is to get your big sledge hammer and bring it down hard on the bick - wear PPE and watch out for flying pieces of cast iron.
--
Stuart Winsor

Midland RISC OS show - Sat July 9th 2011
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Ever drop it on a coyote?
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Drew Lawson | What is an "Oprah"?
| -- Teal'c
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Drew Lawson wrote the following:

???? A farrier's anvil is used to make horseshoes. I don't get the connection.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

he means will e coyote
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wrote:

Wile E. Coyote.
Never shot into the air, either?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhQ4dE_RGnQ
SINNERS!
-- It could probably be shown by facts and figures that there is no distinctively native American criminal class except Congress. -- Mark Twain
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chaniarts wrote the following:

Oh, OK. If he had mentioned Wile E Coyote, I would have gotten the joke.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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writes:

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Silly joke. As others have noted, the character Wile E. Coyote attempted to catch the Road Runner with Rube Goldberg setups, implimented with the help of Acme Equipment(TM).
Many attempts involved mis-engineered methods of dropping an anvil from a cliff to smash the bird. Of course, these ended up smashing him.
(This used to be childhood entertainment.)
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Drew Lawson | It's not enough to be alive
| when your future's been deferred
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