Another way to use the Domino

http://blogs.popularwoodworking.com/editorsblog/PermaLink%2Cguid%2C05298eac-153e-49b8-91b4-ad1c7ce84a15.aspx
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That is a nice looking joint! Thanks for sharing!
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Looks like a biscuit jointer on steroids...
mac
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Leon... that's something that looks pretty cool that probably didn't take all that long to make. My kinda joint! Have you tried to tear one apart yet? I wouldn't be able to resist. When I got my PC557 I glued, waited and tore up all kinds of joints.
A question about the actual application you used, though. I have read about some that have had problems when they put too much glue on the tenon and they can't get them in. One guy went so far as to claim when making pine rail and stile doors that he SPLIT the pine from the pressure of an over glued tenon sealing up and when he tapped it in it broke the wood open!
He put less glue on and hasn't had a problem since. I would think those little bastards (tenons) would have to be the very picture of uniformity to make a claim like that.
Do all the tenons fit that tight when you are using the machine with the reference settings? Did you use the machine with the reference settings on the joint in your picture?
They sure look tight...
Robert
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I have not yet made one like that yet but I commonly make rabbet joints for utility drawers and thought this would be stronger.

:~) Some onelse make this joint. But, I learned quite quickly that a little glue goes a long way. I actually paint the glue on the tennon now rather than put it in the mortise. This way the glue gets applied to exactly where it needs to be and any excess gets scrapped off outside the hole rather than trapped at the bottom of a hole. The Domino tennons have small indentations all around the outside and glue is not entirely scraped off at that point when inserted. I could possibly see a joint splitting but only if excess glue was used and even then I think it would be an exception. Playing around I made an exact fit and an oversized mortise for the smallest 5mm tennons in the edge of 3/4" MDF. I placed 2 tennons in the 2 holes and glued the edges of the MDF together to form an "L" shapped union. This resulted in what appears to be an extremely strong joint that I have not been able to pull a part by hand.

The small tennons fit very snug. Snug enough that I have not been able to press them in completely by hand. A hammer or clamps have always assisted in the insertion process. Often a dry fit is difficult to seperate, I think mostly because the joint needs to be seperated by pulling perfectly perpendicular to the joint line. The larger tennons tend to be a bit easier to insert and pull apart.

Again, that was a magazine article picture. But, I have cut through a tennon joint and yes the fit is perfect so if you wanted the tennons to be exposed like in the picture the fit will be nice and tight.
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Leon wrote:

Hmm, if the fit is -consistently- that good, that might call for some over-sized joints followed by some creative routing. Oh, say, a shallow ogee across the face and edge of the tenon ... might color the outside of the tenon before assembly for a very thin detail line around it.
Bill
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Snip

He did say that he had put too much glue on. He was thinking of his other joining methods using his beadlock and biscuit machines. The piece I read was a little online blurb from one of the editors of WW mag or something similar. Duly noted, when glue was reduced he didn't have to bang the tenons is as hard and they worked fine.

press them in completely by hand. A hammer or clamps >have always assisted in the insertion process. Often a dry fit is >difficult to seperate, I think mostly because the joint needs to be >seperated by pulling perfectly perpendicular to the joint line. He did mention something you just did, and that is the fact that he had a lot of problems with dry fitting. He speculated even using the reference/nonrerference style of mortising that you could have some problems with putting together pieces that have multilple Dominoes in them like cabinet face frames to carcasses, etc.
Thanks for the detailed reply.
Although I kidded about it, I am always interested in a well made new tool that actually has some utility value. I hope you and charlieb keep us up with what you find out as you use them.
Robert
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On Wed, 04 Jul 2007 19:20:12 GMT, "Leon"

Very little good glue surface between the sides and the tenons, and that little bit of the sides left at the front edge is weak. The only thing saving it is the curved ends, which is sort of giving you a dovetail effect. I don't think it's any stronger than it would be with 3 dowels.
-Leuf
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