ANOTHER Shop Heat Question

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Because a house is not a garage. You don't park a car that may leak gasoline in your house.
Just to clarify, I said woodstove, but the code is solid fuel burning stoves. That includes coal, pellets, etc. Ed
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wood heat is great BUT you soon find that you have no scrap wood in the shop for small projects. skeez
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On Fri, 09 Jan 2004 00:40:42 +0000, Nick Bozovich wrote:

If your heating device has an open flame, it is best to have one where you can vent to the outdoors. CO (Carbon monoxide) is odorless and kills. Even if you say your place is not airtight, there can be sufficient buildup of the gas to cause headache and to affect your ability to think. If you were to install a CO detector, it'd most likely be going off constantly.
$114 seems like a deal... Why not take the money you would spend on a 911 call to the ER and put it toward a good heater, one which is properly vented? You would most likely have money left over to buy some nice tools. Take the money your frau would spend on a funderal, and you perhaps outfi the entire shop.
Woodworking is a great hobby, but only if one is around long enough to enjoy it. Be safe.
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C wrote:

Gees, I hope no shop heater is that expensive. Last one I paid for was about $400 for the ambulance plus $350 for the emergency room. Then there was x-rays and two doctors.
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snipped-for-privacy@REMOVEyahoo.comREMOVE says...

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Not to rain on a perfectly good sky is falling, we're all gonna die rant, but you know, these heaters he is referencing are being sold for in-home use and are certified by various agencies as safe for indoor use. These systems are UL listed and have been checked by the CPSC. Check out <http://www.kerosun.com/products/portableheaters/DC-90.mv for a look at the CPSC recommended CO production vs. what Kerosun and other heaters produce. Even though the other heaters do produce somewhat more than the recommended level, 25 ppm is still not a problem: from <http://www.ee.washington.edu/research/microtech/cam/PROCESSES/PDF % 20FILES/Toxicity.pdf>: Example: carbon monoxide, CO hemotoxin; combines with hemoglobin 300X more readily than O2 TLV = 100 ppm; body can tolerate 0.01 % in air @ 1000 ppm (0.1 %) causes headache and nausea @ 10,000 ppm (1.0 %) fatal to adults in 1 min.
So, with adequate ventilation, such as the OP indicated he had in his garage, even an older model heater will be 1/4 what the body can tolerate.
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It most certainly will produce CO2, so do you. ;-) There is always a small amount of CO2 in fresh air. So long as you burn the proper fuel, keep it clean and there is minimal ventilation then it will not produce a toxic concentration or significant CO (carbon monoxide) which is the highly toxic gas to be concerned about.
They are nearly odorless, if you use high-grade kerosine.

Drills, saws, jointers, planers and most other power tools produce mostly chips, and little fine airborn dust. The danger with dust is if something suddenly throws a high concentration up into the air, for example if you turn on a shop vac and forgot to put the filter in it or a pile of sawdust in the frame of the table saw reaches the angle of repose and slides down into the belt and gets scattered.
The simple solution is to use the heater to heat up the shop, shut it down before doing anything that can generate a lot of dust, like sweeping the floor, and when it gets too cold, open the door to vent the dust, turn the heater back on and take a break until the shop heats up again.
--

FF

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Hi Fred
Bullet type kero heater (at least mine) does not present a fire hazard even with fine dust. The thing has a pretty strong internal fan that keeps the majority of the dust away. The small amount of "drift" that catches within the 18" of "serious heat" zone does burn away so proper placement of the unit is important (but not rocket science...use your head). Been using mine for two years without incident and love the amount of heat it produces in my 18'x20' sq ft uninsulated garage, especiallly on 0F nights like we have tonight.

says it

take
and
heater
my
appreciated.
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Nick Bozovich said:

I use a 23,000 BTU kerosene heater in the garage, which is nowhere close to airtight, so I am not as concerned about CO as I would be if it were fully weatherstripped. It works fine. In only emits a noticeable smell when shutting down, running out of fuel, or set at a very low setting. Apparently they are optimized for a certain exposure of wick. It will get a 2 car garage so hot on high, that you'll sweat. I am paranoid about using it, however. I don't leave it burning unattended, and it is placed well away from all materials and walls, etc. It's quiet, of course, but takes one to two hours to heat a leaky garage from 20F to 70F. I bought it for the piece of mind of knowing that when the power goes off during an ice storm, we would have an emergency source of heat. Kerosene runs $1.10 gal in the rural areas, but it is impossible to find in the city. The BORG wants $27 for a 5 gallon can.
I have used it for 3 winters, and it has needed little maintenance. I was shocked at this, because I expected to have to clean the wick and replace the ignitor every year. So far, nothing has been needed. I tear it down, inspect it, and reassemble. Good to go. I would NOT use it in a home without copious amounts of ventilation, around children or pets, or those lacking in common sense.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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