another sharpening question

After having just read a thread from yesterday regarding sharpening, I have another question. People keep talking about touching up the micro bevel, but isn't it true (I'm just checking to make sure I understand) that each time you touch up the micro bevel, it will become bigger, how many times can you mess with it, or how large should it get before you start again?
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True, it will become bigger with each touch up. You can keep going until the micro bevel becomes the entire bevel. However it will take you longer & longer as the micro bevel becomes bigger & bigger. It's up to you how much longer you will tolerate this before staring again,.
Art

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The only reason for creating a micro bevel is so that you can avoid reforming the entire length of the bevel each time you sharpen. This makes resharpening a lot easier as there is a lot less metal to remove. Micro bevels are usually 1 or 2 degrees more than the main bevel. Thus, if you put a bevel of 30 degrees on your chisel followed by a micro bevel of 1 degree and you keep resharpening the microvel it will get larger each time and you will eventually end up with the entire bevel being 31 degrees. You then have the choice of reforming your bevel to its original 30 deg. or simply putting a 1 deg. microbevel on your now 31 deg. main bevel. I guess that theoretically you could end up with a 90 deg. blunt end. Hey, does that make sense?

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Sure, I have a scraper that I think is carbide with a 90 deg. blunt end. I can shave cast iron with minimal effort. The business end holds a 1" x 1" x 1/8" piece of metal that is very shiny, almost like chrome, that can be taken out and turned if needed. Was given to me 20 years ago by a guy who worked at a giant manufacturing/machine company. Not really sure what it is but man can it cut metal.
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*Drumroll*
It's a scraper. :)
I think companies like Bridgeport still hand-scrape ways to get them to the proper degree of flatness, but I could be wrong there- at any rate, it's the old way of getting the ways and work surfaces flat for machine tools. Handy thing you've got there- I've never seen one made for the purpose, they're usually just bits of ground-down old files.
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This looks like it might be the exact tool I have. http://www.greenwood-tools.co.uk/ishop/728/shopscr63.html
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The original micro bevel should be made with only 2 or 3 passes across the stone. When you find that you are making many more passes to sharpen the edge it's time to grind back at the original bevel plus 2 or 3 passes for the new micro bevel.
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