Another reason I prefer Gel Varnishes

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I was finishing up on a small job and needed to touch up 4 spots about the size of a BB. Because the spots probably would not be noticeable I almost used oil on them instead of my gel varnish. But NOOOOOoooooo I pulled out the gel varnish, opened the can, stuck a q-tip in and applied the varnish to the 4 tiny spots. I returned to the can, put the lid on, turned it upside down to give it a solid slam onto the work bench to seal the lid and force the varnish in side to go to the lid side in the upside down position. I then proceeded to carry the can upside down over to the storage cabinet above my drill press and mortiser and as I reached to put the can in the cabinet I bumped the bottom of the gel varnish can against the cabinet opening and every thing went into slow motion.
The lid popped off and the contents proceeded to empty out, half inside the cabinet, the rest on to the top of my tall wooden tool chest, on top of the mortiser, down the side of the stand that the mortiser and drill press are mounted to and the rest make it to the floor. I had to pull the mortiser fan guard off to get the globs of varnish out of the fan fins also. About 1 hour later and 50 or so acetone soaked paper towels later I finished cleaning up.
Gel varnishes pretty much stay put when they are spilled unlike liquid varnishes. Can you imagine 1/2 quart of liquid varnish emptying out over the same places? ;~)
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Quit yer bitching, bubba ... took me longer than that to clean up after dropping and shattering a bottle of Texas Red on the floor ... a tragedy of much greater magnitude in the overall scheme of things. :)
--
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Last update: 10/22/08
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That's alcohol abuse. We are here for you to help you through the intervention.
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"Swingman" wrote

Isn't that a misdemeanor in the great state of Texas?
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Swingman wrote:

Speaking of spillage, it looks like somone over in Hong Kong is spilling a lot of $ tonight...
http://www.kitco.com/images/live/gold.gif
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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of
I can't match your tragedy of colour, but I can beat it with frustration level.
About a year ago, I came home from food shopping and while I was putting my jacket into the closet, I accidentally tore one of the shopping bags hanging on the back of my wheelchair. A quart sized glass bottle of applesauce fell out of one bag, shattered on the floor and proceeded to spread into a yard wide circle. Naturally, I'm sitting in my wheelchair right in the middle of this expanding mess. Problem with that is that I have to roll out of the mess tracking it twenty feet into my apartment to get the paper towels to clean it up. That meant climbing out of the wheelchair, cleaning the wheels, climbing back in and then cleaning bit by bit all the way back to the pool of applesauce.
Four hours of cursing and swearing later, it's all cleaned up. I used to like applesauce.
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I am not bitchen! Had you dropped a bottle of gel Texas Red the clean up would have been faster. ;~)
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Why?
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Why upside down? The product oxidizes/skims over on the air side. If the can is stored upside down the contents will be fresh on the top when you invert it. No skimming over. Paint companies have been doing this for years. The particular brand gel varnish that I use skims over faster than most brands. In fact I ordered a case of it and all the cans were upside down in the shipping box. This trick helps the contents stay fresh on the end that opens, the skim is then on bottom when opened.
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Ok, but then there's a skim piece underneath that might break up and affect the painted surface of whatever you're covering. I don't mind the skim on the top. It's easier and less messry to remove and I know it's not going to affect anything because I've removed it. Even upside down cans of paint can separate some. Proper workmanship is to make sure everything is properly mixed everytime you open the can. I consider it not too dissimilar to some minor safety step you might make everytime you use a power tool.
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wrote in message

I don't do this with paints only the varnishes and in particular the gel varnishes. The bottom broken skim on a gel varnish is pretty much a non issue, it stays on the bottom. You really don't have to ever mix gel varnishes they don't really separate.
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Ok, you're right about that. I wasn't thinking "gel" when I replied. In all honesty, I've never seen (or noticed) a skim coat on anything that had gel properties.
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wrote in message

Gels get a really thick skim on top, easily 1/16" thick in the thin spots. Additionally the more small jobs I do and the more often I have to open that can the more likely and sooner the gel starts to happen. Once it starts it can form in as little as 2 weeks.
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that
it
Well, now that you mention it, on a recent gel stain I used, I *did* notice some splotchy colour differences on the surface of the stain two days after I reopened the can. The project was something simple using unsanded oak and didn't need special care, so I ignored the stain differences. I'll make it a point to examine it a little closer next time.
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wrote in message

Gel STAINS are a little different, you will see some liquid form on the top and it is best to stir them up a little. If you don't you can get what you witnessed as some of can go on thinner. Most all gel stains also have a "little", varnish in them also over longer periods of time they can skim over also but typically not anything near as quickly as gel varnishes.
And since you mentioned unsanded oak, gels do much better on sanded surfaces, because they go on thick they can really vary in shade. It is hard to wipe out the more coarse areas on the wood. I learned this 20 or so years ago by trying to take a short cut.
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But... but... I can think of a couple of reasons why not. ;) Thanks. I'll think about it.
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It will be a safe bet that I will be much more careful with putting the lid back on. I had loaned this can out to a neighbor and the seal was gunked up. I am not sure how that happened with a gel varnish. I guess he used a brush to apply it and did the scraping on the side of the can opening thing.
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Leon wrote:

Which leads to the obvious question... what about stirring?
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This skim that I am talking about on gel varnishes does not dissolve it remains a solid and you really don't want that mixed up in the gel. I have broken a hole through it with a screw driver and pulled chunks of it out with a pair of pliers. the newly exposed gel varnish is good to go provided there are no chunks from the shim mixed in with it. In a liquid varnish it may settle to the bottom but in a gel it would remain suspended. It's best to avoid disturbing it. If it forms on the bottom all the better.
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My personal best is a VERY large jar of mayo that seems to stick to everything like napalm.
Prego sauce also makes a very large mess when dropped.
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