Another "Me 2" track saw, from some one we know about

Triton! And apparently Kreg Tools is now the Triton importer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
ća7CzGGULc
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Not much info on this yet. It must be a brand new product. But it does have a couple nice features. I like the fact that you can buy ordinary circular saw blades for it. And how do you like that nifty dust collection system? LOL Actually for me, it would be just fine. If you are working outside and don't use it that much, it should be just fine. I wonder how the pricing will be. It is going to be one price everywhere or will some folks discount it?
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On 5/28/13 3:00 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

The other thing they don't show is the actual cut. How clean is it? Yes, "standard" sized blades are great... unless you can't find a good one. The good thing about Festool proprietary blades is you know they will produce a perfect cut every time.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 5/28/2013 3:47 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Yeah, the good blade is kinda the point with a track saw, otherwise just use a straight edge to guide your old stand by circular saw.
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On 5/28/13 7:02 PM, Leon wrote:

Don't they also have something to stop tear-out on the top of the sheet?
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-MIKE-

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Festool has a zero clearance insert to help protect the waste side of the cut..
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That of course, is why you buy FT. On the other hand, if you are breaking down product for later cutting or easier handling at the table saw, you could keep track of the waste side pretty easily. Since the comparable FT system is about 3 times as much, price and specific use would certainly be a factor in purchasing for me.
After seeing the cuts Karl made with his FT arrangement, in all complete honesty, I wouldn't have trouble building cabinets with that system, using that track saw for my final cuts.
That being said, Mike you should try the line of Freud Diablo circular saw blades. Most tearout from using a circular saw comes from the saw not being parallel to the cut, whether the saw and the shoe are not parallel to each other, or someone is trying to freehand a cut.
I bought a Freud blade for my circular saw and used it with my new (at that time) Makita saw with a clamped guide when making a quick fixture for a client. NO tear out, no chipping, and no saw marks on the plywood! No one was more astonished than me. I have used that setup and that blade from them several times since, and those red blades are the real stuff. I haven't bought anything for wood work but those blades for the last several years.
Before I sent the Triton back I would put one of those Freud blades in the machine to see how it did.
Robert
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On 5/29/13 9:35 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

To me, this would be the litmus test. When you start getting above $500, the thing better cut a ready-to-assemble edge.

I think blade flex has something to do with it, too. Those circ-saw blade are so thin, presumably because so many circ-saws are underpowered these days. I wish some company would make a line of great, thick kerf circ-saw blade.
With the micro thin finish veneers on modern plywoods, I have found it next to impossible to get a clean cross cut on many sheets, with a circ-saw. This, like most plywoods (of course), will also vary from sheet to sheet. Rip cuts are usually clean as a whistle.

I am a Freud fan and I think they get a bad rap because of their Diablo consumer big-box blades, being used by low-skill, low-information users in low-quality, poorly set-up (non-parallel, etc) saws. If you happened to have a model number for the Freud blade you use, I'd be curious to know which specific blade you use.
After working with bamboo plywood, I have developed techniques for razor clean cross-cutting. The stuff is unforgiving. Before ordering an expensive blade for the table saw, like a Forrest, I went to Lowes to see if they had something I could buy and use that day.
I found a 10" Irwin Marples cross cut blade, that has very aggressive, pointy, teeth. I was skeptical and fully expected to be returning it. It's not thin, but not thick, so I used one stabilizer with it. With the proper height, the cuts were remarkable... extremely clean. On hardwoods, the cut edges look almost sanded. It cut very nice edges on the bamboo plywood. I still have to use a zero clearance insert to get clean cross-cut edges on the bottom of the plyboo, that's just how unforgiving it it.
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On 5/28/2013 3:00 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Pricing, just the saw, $319.00, with 50+ inch track $389, IIRC
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