Another Electrical question

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Well shoot. I ardy sent you an explanation. ;~)
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I just have a 30' #10-3 extension cord that I run to my 220 volt tools as I need them.
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Did you purchase it as an extension cord or did you fabricate it yourself? Do you protect it with anything? Flexible conduit?
I'm just a little squeamish of a high voltage cord on the floor of the shop.
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wrote:

Naaa.. it's just 220 volt. The rest of the world run their entire households on 220. We're talking toasters, TV's, every-day stuff. The US and Canada, and perhaps a small province in Africa are the only ones running on 110 AFAIK.
Have you ever tried to cut a 10 gauge 'cord' to make an extension? That's enforced, tough stuff.
No worries, stoutperson, although a healthy respect for anything over 12 volts is wise.
r
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I was in a sporting goods store about umm 20 years ago and spied a 69 volt battery. It was about 12" long and 2" square. The positive and negative terminals were on top and unshielded. Naturally I put my finger across both terminals and said bad words loudly. :~)
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I'd have loved to have seen that. Really. I could almost see myself as having done something similar. Now I know for sure - you are the kind of guy that pee'd on an electric fence, just to see...
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under a barbed wire fence in the brush and placed my sweaty forehead nice & tight against a wire fence just as the pulser turned on. I thought my buddy had clubbed my with his gun butt! And was ready to aim my gun at him until I saw the confused look on his face! What an experience! Live & learn; if you're lucky enough.
Pop
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Maybe THAT is what happened with Cheney?
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Leon wrote:

Fingers on the same hand? There may be more efficient pathways from one hand to the other than one through the heart, but--sheesh!
er
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FINGER singular, on hand. The terminals were about 1" apart.
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Leon wrote:

Whew. You said it was a 12" battery and I figured the terminals were on opposite ends.
er
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Good Lord, man....it's 220, not the transformer primary on the floor ;-). If it was me, I'd consider just wiring another outlet on the same circuit.
todd
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I made it my self.

The rubber insulation is very tough. 6 years old and looks like new.
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Ever been to a rock concert? An outdoor event with large scale PA systems? A carnival? Ever notice those big thick black electrical cords that everyone is trudgin over? Tens of thousands of feet daily. Laying in mud puddles.
Get the right stuff and your fears will be moot. You don't need the same heavy cords that I just referenced but the point is that armor cladding is not necessary for what you're doing. Talk to an electrician. Go to an electrical supply house - a real one. Tell them what you're looking to do and ask them what the properly rated insulation would be for you.
I'm sure someone here can tell you. There are some real live electricians here and there are some hacks like me who know a few to a lot of things. Sometimes ya takes yer chances with the advice you see here because you don't always know who really knows what they're talking about and who is just talking. Go to a pro and you'll stand your best chance of getting the right scoop.
If you're squeamish I don't understand why you would ask a question like this of a woodworking group. Squeamish is good, but why not go to the right source and then you'll really know.
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You're a little vague on the requirements, but you can either purchase or make your own extension cord for 220V. Just be sure to use the proper plugs and receptacles for that voltage and the proper wire gauge for the current draw of the tools and the length of the cord.
You don't necessarily need to run the wire inside metal conduit, unless you want the added protection from mechanical abuse that such treatment would afford. It would be best to ground that conduit on the off chance that the hot wire shorted to it. Fred
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stoutman wrote:

service panel using 10/3 romex. This supplied power to my 3 hp cabinet saw and 15 inch planer. I purchased a 10 ga. extension cord that was rated heavy enough to handle the 220v current and put converted the ends to 15a. 250v plug and receptacle. My 220 line from the service panel terminates at a single outlet about 10 feet away. I use the extension cord then to supply the power to whichever piece of equipment I need to use. It is absolutely essential to have an equipment ground back to your service panel. As long as your outlet is grounded, there is no need to run your extension cord through conduit unless you think there is some danger of damaging the cord. I never leave my extension cord plugged in when I leave the shop and it is never subjected to an environment that could cause damage to it. I will say that my installation is temporary until I get my shop built. A permanent installation would be done differently.
Martie
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Here's a thought for your rewire: Consider a set of switches near the door to control Main Power to the shop. That way when you leave the shop you can kill the majority of power to it from those switches. That way there aren't so many things to "check" as you leave, and you can kill it all from right there. Especially handy for the lights and most, not all, ckts can usually be done that way. I used a couple or relays to prevent adding long wire runs just to have the switches. Best case, IMO, would be to use relays for all of it and a doorbell xfmr to control the relays; easier to wire and no added wire lengths. Lines I didn't switch, I added a nightlight to one outlet. I hate having to go into the shop to see if I turned everything off. 220 of course, well, that shouldn't be switched IMO.
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In short, Go to the borg and buy a 25' heavy duty 10ga extension cord. Hard wire it to the TS and put a 220v plug on the other end. A 10ga 3conductor cord at 220v can handle 35amps, way more than a TS will need. Remember voltage doesn't determiine the size of the wire you need, amperage does. An average 110v 1hp motor draws approx 15amps at 3450rpm. All hings being equal a 220v 1hp motor draws 7.5amps. See the point? I strongly recommend against using metal conduit. If you did you'd definitely need to ground it for safety. With my jointer, I keep the wire coiled up until I need it so it doesn't get ruined. If you looking at a semi permanent install, and really want to use conduit, then use hard conduit not flexible. There would be less chance of damaging the cable inside.
And for the guy who thinks the question is too technical for this NG, remember almost everyone here has a day job too. Mine has been 21 years in the Navy as an electronics technician and special warfare operator... This electrical stuff is childs play for me, the woodworking kicks my butt though, but I'm learning. Rich Harris
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I don't think Pop5 was suggesting people in the NG could not answer the question. I think he was commenting on how the question was asked. I believe his point was if you don't know how to ask the question you're not going to understand the answer.

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I think I asked the question correctly because my question was answered.
And yes, I understood the answer.
Thanks for caring! :)
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