Another Crown Molding Question??

Haven't been here in a while, really busy. I'm installing crown molding in a customers house that has uneven ceilings, way out of level. The crown is coming off kitchen cabinets and mounting to ceiling and cabinets. When I line up the molding there is a pretty large gap at one end. If I close the gap then the molding does not sit level on the cabinet face. How do you guys deal with this problem? I've told the customer that if I drop the crown down a bit then the gap is less noticeable and runs the total length of the cabinet. They don't like that saying dust will build up on top of cabinet and these folks are dust freaks. They are willing to live with the gap but I can't stand the way it looks. I can just imagine a friend of theirs comes over and asks, who did the crown molding cause they did a shit job. Thanks for any advice!!
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evodawg wrote:

Typically one tries to use a blocker and mount against it if the expedient of leaving a space gap isn't acceptable.
Depending on the amount, you may need to taper it to offset at least a portion of the out-of-level amount so the moulding still runs nearly parallel to the cabinet face.
The idea is to make up the out-of-level against the ceiling rather than closer to the fixed, hard visual line of the cabinet opening/doors...
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dpb wrote:

I have added a spacer or nailer to the top of the cabinets since the top of cabinets and crown would not reach the ceiling. The spacer will be visible and is now part of the cabinet, meaning same species and finished to match cabinets and crown. Actually spacers that would have been used on side of cabinets where they meet the drywall wall.
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On 08/27/2009 08:18 AM, evodawg wrote:

Now's your chance to offer them custom-made molding tapered to match the amount of out-of-square!
Is re-hanging the cabinets parallel to the ceiling an option? Alternately, take a look at what this guy did:
http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base_images/zp/level_cabinets.jpg
(taken from the discussion at http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Level_Cabinets_in.html )
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

That's not an option. The Cabinets are square and plumb. The ceiling is messed up. Damn framers and drywallers. I'll take a look..

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evodawg wrote:

How much of a gap? If it's relatively small caulk should work.
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Nova wrote:

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wrote:

We've dealt with this problem quite a few times. Normally most crowns have a top detail that sorta comes straight down from the ceiling and has a little height to it. One method (if your gap is not too large) is to take the crown to the jointer or table saw or even a belt sander and try to remove material from that top edge on the end opposite the gap. This might involve just a little removal from one end or a gradual removal over a longer length to close a gap on the other end. You can try to mark the piece(s) by temporarily installing the piece with the good end against the ceiling and maintain the same reveal on the cabinets. Then you can scribe the top face of the crown. Before marking it, use your scribe to check (both ends) to see if you can remove enough material from that top detail without getting below it into the curved detail of the crown. This will make the cabinets look correct but will show the different reveal (on the crown detail) at the ceiling.
Good luck, I feel your pain.
Mike O.
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Mike O. wrote:

Thought about scribing but the gap is pretty large and I'm sure it will end up cutting out the detail. I showed her the problem and she seems to be able to live with a gap, he on the other hand wants perfection. Told them I would do my best. This freakin guy is an engineer and really anal. She's cool and told him to keep out of her kitchen. Think I'll try scribing and splitting the difference like you do when installing doors and out of plumb door openings.
yeah it is painful not to mention time consuming!!!!
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Well, they don't agree with each other, which means no matter what you do, you'll be wrong by someone's opinion. Do what she says, it's her kitchen.
I also feel your pain. That's a tough spot to be in.
jc
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evodawg wrote: ...

...
Another choice if you don't like the bed mounted on the ceiling w/ appropriate taper as previously suggested (which is by far the easiest solution) is to add a small finger mould (miniature quarter or fingerlip or similar) to fill the gap at the top of the crown. In that case you may want to set the crown just a little lower at the low end. The extra breaklines disguise the offset.
Use backer blocking for the crown to register the angle correctly and provide good nailing surface but doing that makes the installation easier in any case....
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dpb wrote:

other wall came out perfect. I split the difference and it looks ok. I did shave a bit out of the middle without destroying the profile. The customer loves it, I'm a little more critical of my work, and in my book it's just ok. The other side looks great! I know how crown is suppose to look. It seems they are more worried what the miter joint looks like. Those are not the problem. I did use backers so had good nailing surface... Its been awhile since I installed crown from cabinet top to ceiling.
Thanks to all for the suggestions.
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wrote:

I'd slightly change the molding to fit, trimming or adding filler. It is easier to install crown in layers, but that's not always the case. If the molding is painted you have the luxury of caulk. Other times you have top float a wall or ceiling with drywall compound. Crown must be done right--If the job is a botched, the mistakes will be there for all to see.
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On the house my wife and I just bought, I noticed there are about 3 places where crown molding pieces meet unevenly, maybe up to 1/16" (max) difference in their height at the joints. Being a neophyte, It occurred to me that I might chisel and sand the joints, but caulk sounds like a nice possibility (along with some chisel work at the high spots which are flat). My intuition would suggest perhaps making a crown molding-shaped applicator from a coffee can lid, or similar. The molding is painted. How is using caulking different than using spackling compound (which I am more familiar with) or drywall compound?
Thanks, Bill
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Bill wrote:
<snipped>

Spackle dries faster than drywall compound. Both are brittle when dry. Caulk usually remains flexible when it's dry allowing for expansion and contraction.
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wrote:

Recently I installed a 6" Colonial baseboard (which I made) with a 1/8" flat top that sets against the wall. One wall was quite concave, too concave to bend the baseboard around it. Caulk would make the 1/8" thumbnail 1/4" wide at certain points making it look bad. Instead, I opted to float the drywall so that the baseboard top looked 1/8" all along the baseboard. It's a judgment call from the trim carpenter on what will look best. Inside a closet, or behind a water heater tank, it doesn't matter much. But your molding, expecially crown, should look excellent (and show no gaps in 5 years) when you first walk into the room. Don't think "I'll fix this gap later with caulk," but use it as a last resort. When installed properly crown molding can add value to your home, for about $600 labor for an average room.
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Phisherman wrote:

textured and painted. Wow, 600.00 where do you get that kind of money for an average room? I usually get anywhere from 300 to 500.
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