Angled joist hangers?

Number 1 son has drafted me to help build a pretty sizable deck at his nort hwoods cabin. The deck is a 5-sided trapezoid. Anyone know of a manufactur er of joist hangers that can accommodate the hanging of a non-perpendicular joist? Google has led me to believe there are 45 degree hangers, but his requirements are closer to 20-30 degrees.
Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/8/15 5:50 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

Search for adjustable SKEW joist hangers. The Simpson code is LSSU
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/8/2015 6:30 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

And if you have an iPad or iPhone Simpson has a free app listing their products and their specs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 6:50:59 PM UTC-4, Gramps' shop wrote:

urer of joist hangers that can accommodate the hanging of a non-perpendicul ar joist? Google has led me to believe there are 45 degree hangers, but hi s requirements are closer to 20-30 degrees.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmmpqB7vbtI

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are, and yes, Simpson Strong Tie Has them. Also, there is a lot of surface area for nail, screw our lag attachment. Some use pressure blocking also, in lieu of joist hangers, although in a wet location, they tend to trap moisture over time, and can cause rot. Some joist hangers come with an ability to free-scew......I know that sounds a bit odd..... john
"Gramps' shop" wrote in message
Number 1 son has drafted me to help build a pretty sizable deck at his northwoods cabin. The deck is a 5-sided trapezoid. Anyone know of a manufacturer of joist hangers that can accommodate the hanging of a non-perpendicular joist? Google has led me to believe there are 45 degree hangers, but his requirements are closer to 20-30 degrees.
Larry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/8/2015 6:50 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

I'm of no help with joist hangers, but could you explain what shape a "five-sided trapezoid" is?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/9/2015 8:36 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I'm guessing a square or rectangle with one corner cut at an angle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

a 5-sided trapezoid = parallelogram - triangle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/9/2015 2:52 PM, Bill wrote:

a triangle could yield a triangle, a trapezoid (4 sided, naturally) a pentagon (irregular) or a six-sided figure with a concave section. :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg Guarino wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They're using them in the NHL now. Behind the net, there's two lines that define the trapezoid. Four sides, plus one big downside: If a goaltender plays the puck behind the icing line and outside the trapezoid it's a minor penalty.
What it has to do with joist hangers, I don't know...
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, April 8, 2015 at 5:50:59 PM UTC-5, Gramps' shop wrote:

urer of joist hangers that can accommodate the hanging of a non-perpendicul ar joist? Google has led me to believe there are 45 degree hangers, but hi s requirements are closer to 20-30 degrees.

OK, my bad ... it's been 60+ years since HS geometry. The shape of this se ction of the deck actually has six sides. Think of a corporal's strips.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gramps' shop wrote:

If he strips in public he may lose a stripe.
--
 GW Ross 

 A moment's insight is sometimes worth 
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Gramps' shop wrote:

have hangers, but a ledge was nailed on and the joists were cut out to sit on the ledge then toenailed or through nailed.
--
 GW Ross 

 A moment's insight is sometimes worth 
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/9/2015 10:49 PM, Gramps' shop wrote:

LOL I think geometry is a bit past counting. ;~) 5 sides vs. 6 sides
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 9 Apr 2015 20:49:20 -0700 (PDT), "Gramps' shop"

...a "chevron"?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Take from an old house framer...
Simpson makes fantastic framing and structural aids; the piece shown in the video and its application are unsuitable for a weight bearing member. Pro bably fine for a light weight roof structure application, but as a former F HA inspector, I certainly wouldn't pass it as a floor joist.
First, the cut on the joist should be a cheek cut so that when installed th e face of the joist is in 100% contact with the adjacent beam. Think of a roof joist in a hand framed roof and what the rafters look like when nailed to the hip joist. A long, angled "cheek" is cut on the rafter, then it is nailed to the hip rafter through the cheek.
Second, when I build a deck (or an odd second story on a house) and it has that kind of detail (compound angle cheek cut) I do as Mr. Ross observed, a nd install a ledger board. Properly nailed to your weight bearing beam, th ey will hold a tremendous load. So, cut the joist with a cheek cut and sim ply set it on ledger. If the bearing point is open more than 1/8", bevel t he entire ledger the appropriate angle for bearing, then attach. Or you ca n notch the bottom or the rafter (my preference) with the correct angles fo r 100% bearing.
After the proper cheek cut, you can use the Simspon tie on a deck and it sh ould work fine with the proper framing web work as part of the structure.
I think it is important to note that the Simpson video only shows the insta llation of their product, NOT suitability of purpose or recommendations for proper framing techniques. Note that the metal hanger is shown on its att achment on one side ONLY. If you are framing a weight bearing floor/deck a nd it slopes, for proper framing the joists should buttress to a heavy, non flexing beam as the angle has transferred not only the dead load, but the live load (and flex) to the lower end of the angle on the structure. Also, with the heavier beam (to negate LATERAL flex)in place on the low side, yo u have effectively "trapped" the joist on place.
I would highly recommend using/borrowing/buying a copy of Rob Thallon's "Gr aphic Guide to Frame Construction". Having framed a couple of hundred hous es from top to bottom, and then 40 years of remodel, repair, rebuilds, and modifications to different structures, I thought I had seen it all. Nope. I still use that book from time to time for details. It is the best I have ever seen on all matters framing. More importantly, no methods or details I have used in that book have ever failed or even been unsatisfactory.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.