Angle grinder for cutting wood

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On Sun, 16 May 2010 11:25:02 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

My father had the B&D circular saw attachment and the finishing sander attachment. I inherited them and used them for a few years.
When I finally got around to buying a Bosch circular saw, I wondered why on earth I had struggled on with the clunky B&D attachment.
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Bruce wrote:

Somewhere I think I also still have the Vertical Drill Stand and the Horizontal Drill Stand (aka bench-grinder conversion tool)!

As Andrew alluded to, because of the prohibitive cost back then. I can remember my parents buying their first (and only - Mum still has it!) B&D drill in the early 70s. It was a 2-speed hammer job, and IIRC it cost 30-40 GBP, which would be worth probably ten times that in todays money. They certainly weren't a common part of people's household stuff as they are today. Presumably other portable power tools must have been similarly priced, accounting for the plethora of attachments you used to buy for them. God it was a PITA always swapping them over though!
David
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On 16/05/2010 19:28, Lobster wrote:

I recall my mother buying a B&D suitcase in the early 80's, that came with a 2 speed hammer drill and a bunch of accessories. Cost was 84 IIRC from Argos (or possibly the catalogue shop that preceded it. These included the circular saw that got a fair bit of use (but with hindsight was pretty poor!), an orbital sander (not too bad), and a jigsaw (had the ergonomics of a pissed off octopus!) The drill itself is still going... although it gets little use these days.
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John Rumm wrote:

Wow- portable power tools for home use seemingly took a long winding road in UK. (Maybe because of the different power?) All those tools you described were available at realistic prices in the states by late 60s early 70s- as stand-alone tools, not a 'Transformer' kit. Most homes that had even a rudimentary workbench had a 3/8" drill, a small saber saw, and a cheap circular saw. Sanders and such were usually only purchased if the Mrs. was into furniture refinishing or something. This was stuff for repairs and backyard construction of kid-stuff, not for fine cabinetry.
Of course, my experience may be atypical- I grew up in a construction company, and most of the kids I hung out with had fathers known to have swung a hammer or two in their day.
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aem sends...

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It happens that aemeijers formulated :

The stand-alone power tools started to become affordable for DIY from around the mid 80's in the UK. From around 2000 the prices have really fallen, due to all of the cheap imported stuff.
My father's only power tool was a B&D drill from the 1960's, which I know cost a small fortune when he bought it. It was beautifully made and was still in pristine condition when I disposed of it a few years ago - its relatively small chuck made it not very practical for modern usage.
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I still have my first drill, bought in the early '60s. Cost IIRC 11 quid - pretty well a week's take home for me and I wasn't in a badly paid job. 3/8th chuck two speed B&D - all aluminium and painted blue. It still works well - but I did have it overhauled at B&D in the 70s as I had a mate who worked at the factory in Spennymoor? and at least the gearbox was changed as that is now gold. Had a circular saw and jigsaw attachment for it - both pretty useless.
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*Plagiarism saves time *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 16/05/2010 22:11, aemeijers wrote:

They were certainly available long before that - but often the prices were prohibitive - partly because other than basic things like drills, much of the kit was professional level stuff not really aimed at the general public.
(That 84 would be something like 270 ($400) in today's money allowing for inflation).

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Yup, had one of those

It was usefull for cutting sheet material or ripping down the odd floorboard :-)
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Stuart wrote:

Yes, I can imagine ripping a floorboard with that thing :-)
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Tim Watts wrote:

You definitely want a low-viscosity blade.
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diamond will absolutely NOT be any good whatsoever in wood.
If it's so thin, just snap it over your knee. If you can't snap it over your knee, you need a circular saw and carbide blade. You could use a jig saw or reciprocating saw if that was something you already had. There are wood cutting blades for offset grinders, but they are VERY dangerous unless you are well versed in their use and even then can really hurt you - I would NOT suggest one.
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Put it across a couple of bricks and stamp/jump on it.
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john hamilton wrote:

Well, no.
First, the basic rule is the inverse relationship between tooth size and material hardness: The harder the material, the smaller the teeth (generally). For cutting granite, you use diamonds; for cutting soft wood you use something like 24/tpi.
Second, a circular saw with a demolition blade won't even hiccup with a nail.
Third, if the wood is too flimsy, stack up several pieces and cut the lot.
Me? I'd burn the stuff in situ and be done with it.
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On 15 May,

Not with an angle grinder!
I have one of the few wood cutters for an angle grinder - the Arbortech disk. It's also just about the scariest power tool I use (I refuse to use a Lancelot angle grinder disk) I've never seen a saw blade for an angle grinder and wouldn't trust it at that speed anyway.
This is not a good idea.
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Advertise it as "free firewood, cut it up and haul it away".
Pete Stanaitis --------------------
john hamilton wrote:

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RE: Subject
Glad to see a lot of new partipican from the UK on this thread.
Welcome to the wreck.
Lew
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I suspect that is more due to the cross posting than actual newcomers to the wreck :-)
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Coarse aluminum oxide. Diamond costs more, but doesn't cut any better. Save it for hard materials that won't clog wheels, like concrete or tile.
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john hamilton wrote:

Came across a leaflet in local builders merchant this morning that reminded me of this thread.
Would this do what you want?
http://www.duro-diamonds.com/l-gb/diamond-tipped-cutting-tool.asp?p 
No idea of the price and I think the smallest blade is 125mm so may not be any good to you.
But they look interesting. Has anyone used one?
Andrew
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Just ask MR. B.
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