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You can buy "Lazy Susan" hardware...ya know, the hardware used to support a manually turning center piece for your dinning room table, so the family can get to the food without reaching.
Attach the motor to the base. This would facilitate the use of 2 separate pieces for the pedestal...base and turning platform.
I would imagine the pedestal could be any shape using this approach
...do
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motor.
Convince her that it would be hopelessly tacky. It would look like a department store window. (In which museums do the statues rotate?) -- Ernie
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How about building the pedestal with a rotating top, but without the motor: rotate the statue by hand a few degrees whenever the mood moves you....

(Haven't
kind
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I just finished sharpening my first chisel with Steve Lamantia's Scary Sharp method and now stand before in stunned testimony: this technique is life-altering! I now have an ordinary, off-the-shelf bench chisel (Stanley, for Pete's sake) that is at least as sharp as any razor blade I've ever used. It's going to take a month for me to regrow the hairs on my arm after "testing" the edge over and over again. I'm not kidding, folks: it slices them off just by pressing the edge - lightly! - against the base of *a* hair.
(I know, I know - I need to get a better life, but still....)
The only change to the system that I made was to add a final polishing with crocus paper, which seemed to improve the sharpness somewhat over the 2000-grit level.
DanD
For anyone who doesn't know what the heck I'm talking about, here it is:
**********************************************
Condensed Version of How to sharpen a plane blade with sandpaper.
Mercilessly butchered into a Condensed "How to" Version by J. Gunterman from the Original by the Steve Lamantia.
To lap the back behind the cutting bevel:
Use a very light coatings of 3M "77" spray adhesive to temporarily glue small 1-1/2" x 3-1/2" rectangular pieces of sandpaper along the edge of a sheet of 1/4" plate-glass.
The paper to use is Aluminum Oxide in grits 50, 80, and 100, and Silicon Carbide (wet-or-dry to you lay people) in grits of 150, 180, 220, 320, 400, 600, 1200, and 2000. The plate glass should be placed with its edge flush to the edge of the workbench. Grits can be skipped, if desired, but more time on each grit will then be required to fully remove the scratches from the previous grit. Using the gradual progression as listed, however, will require only about a minute or so with each grit."
Lap the end one inch of the back of the iron on each grit in turn. You could use it wet or dry.
About every ten seconds or so, stop and brush off the sandpaper with a whisk broom and wipe the blade off on your shirt.
About ten minutes after starting, you should have gone from 50 grit on up to 2000, and there will be a mirror finish on the back of that iron the likes of which must be seen.
Then jig the blade in a Veritas honing jig or go it by hand--
Clamp the blade down in the Veritas blade-holder device, taking care to have the bevel resting on the glass perfectly along both edges. Adjust the microbevel cam on the jig up to its full two-degree microbevel setting -- and hone away on the 2000-grit
Flip the blade over on the sandpaper several times, hone and lap, hone and lap, each time gentler and gentler, to remove the little bit of wire edge
The resulting little thin secondary bevel should be quite shiny by this time.
Remove the blade from the jig, and perform the "shave some arm hairs off" test, or the sharpness test of your own choice.
Of course, the ultimate test of a plane iron's sharpness is what it does on wood.
When it is all done, peel the sandpaper from the glass and throw it away. Then, scrape the little bit of residual adhesive from the glass with a razor blade, a quick wipedown with acetone on a piece of paper towel, and the cleanup is done in a minute.
No oil, no water, no mess, no glaze or flatness problems to worry about, and a cutting edge that is Scary-Sharp (TM).
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<snip> I have a question about sharpening in general. I have used the scary sharp method with amazing results on cheap chisels as well as my plane irons. What I need to know is if I'm doing it correctly. My question is: Do you both push the blade down the paper as well as pull it back, or do you only move the blade in one direction (eg push the blade down the paper)? I know that when I sharpen my kitchen knives that I only hone in one direction, but wanted to verify the same information for chisels and irons.
TIA Bill
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If it works, you're doing it right.

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: I have a question about sharpening in general. I have used the scary : sharp method with amazing results on cheap chisels as well as my plane : irons. What I need to know is if I'm doing it correctly. My question : is: Do you both push the blade down the paper as well as pull it : back, or do you only move the blade in one direction (eg push the : blade down the paper)?
A disadvantage of using coated abrasives for this kind of sharpening is that the blade will tend to plane the grains from the paper, if not actually cut through it.
I have seen one technique recommended by a well-known writer who moves the blade in a direction parallel to the edge, presumably to reduce this effect.
However there is some information that goes against pressure on the forward stoke. This can be seen on my web site. Please see 'Sharpening Notes' - 'Some Scientific Light on Sharpening Technique'.
For most practical purposes, I reckon that abrading on a hard surface (oilstone, diamond stone or glass) wins hands-down. You can do the natural thing and push on the forward stroke.
Jeff G
-- Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK Email address is username@ISP username is amgron ISP is clara.co.uk Website www.username.clara.net
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Snip

Scary Sharp has given me back the joys of using my hand planes I inherited from my dad. It is realy nice to be able to take a paer thin shaving of a piece of wood with a scary sharpened hand plane.
Regards George SA
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Patrick Fischer wrote:

Hmmm. I don't know how practical it would be, but I'm visualizing a planetary gear from out of an automatic transmission with the mating gear somehow mounted on the end of a motor. You might need to scrounge up some more gears in order to get enough reduction to have enough power to move the statue, and to get it slow enough that the statue doesn't fly off.
I've never done anything with gears, so I can't make any specific suggestions. Sounds like a fun project though. I've always wanted to make something with gears.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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I'm not sure how heavy the piece is that needs to be rotated but I was thinking an old belt-drive record player with the platters reversed might do the trick. Instead of rotating at 33 or 45 rpm, gearing it to turn at 1 or 2 rpm might provide enough power to work.
Lee
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panty play to your gear
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OK Folks, I'm not feeling the "love". Suggesting that she forget the rotation factor seems wonderful but what if she doesn't?! Patient guy that I am, I'll allow you all some more time to think on this... Pat..

motor.
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I'm thinking a lazy susan bearing and a clockwork type motor, say from an old microwave oven turntable.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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A "lazy-susan" type bearing, a "ring gear", and a small, relatively low- RPM motor turning a worm gear to drive it.
It's really _not_ very difficult to do.
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Robert Bonomi wrote:

(c) wouldn't have enough power to spin anything heavy anyway, and the 20-year-old belt would break.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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