Amount of lighting

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On Mon, 29 Nov 2010 21:04:56 -0800, Mike M

Don't you feel that NINE dual 4' fluors would decently light up that 20x25' shop space? If not, fall in behind Lew. I'm doing OK with 5 of 'em in a 20x24' double car shop (w/ attached home.)
-- Happiness comes of the capacity to feel deeply, to enjoy simply, to think freely, to risk life, to be needed. -- Storm Jameson
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Mine is 20'x 24' too. Almost exactly 1/2 of the ceiling is basically occupied by the electric "garage door". Although putting lights above it may be possible, I am not interested in considering it at this time. I'll do some more modeling in a few days based upon recent input folks have generously provided to me.
Good thoughtful comments on the task lighting above. Not exactly sure how to take them into consideration, but doing so seems like the right thing to do. Still homework to do on this..more modeling. One good thing that is the price of my fixtures may have went down since I set aside the deluxe wrap-arounds so I should be able to buy a few more.
Bill
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Bill,
I have the same situation in my garage/shop with the overhead door. During the day with the garage door open I get plenty of light through the opening. But at night and when it is too cool outside to keep the door open, I have two 2-light 48" florescents over where the door opens. Sure allows me more room to work with good lighting. Just a thought. YMMV.
Steve
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On 11/30/2010 2:47 AM, Steve wrote:

Nice idea. Sounds like a whole nuther circuit. For me, it will have to wait until the next round! :)
Thank you, Bill
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OMG, don't even think about NOT putting lights above the door, Bill! It will be closed 99% of the time (keeping noise from your neighbors if nothing else) and you'll want that light without heat, cold, or gusts of wind, on dark days, early in the morning (layout/glueups and assembly only?), and after sundown.
Ayup, it's time to start cuttin' into that drywall if you didn't wire for the entire ceiling. Add that switch while you're at it. 3 rows of 3 fixtures with 2 rows of 2 in between them, switched for even and odd rows. 3' spacing between rows instead of 4', or go 2' from walls and keep the 4' row spacing.
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- (door side) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
It's closer to Lew's modeling (way too much, IMHO) but it's switchable to avoid the need for sunglasses. Pure white EGGSHELL paint is the perfect mix for reflection without glare or thrown shadows.

You'll intuitively know when and where to add task lighting. Drill presses are notoriously lacking in light, so that's one area. Mills are, too. Extra light is needed inside a bowl when you're on a lathe, etc. A strip light over the back of the bench can be handy for assembly and markup. Your eyes, your call.
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
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On 11/30/2010 7:57 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Ed Zachary! I have lights above my door as well, and I use them all the time (when the door is shut). Just be sure to put them on a separate switch so you can turn them off when the door is open.
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On 11/30/2010 9:29 AM, Steve Turner wrote:

Does any one no of a switch that could be put in the garage door opener that would allow the lights to work on the normal switch when the door is down, but turn them off the lights above the door when the door goes up?
If so how would it be wired?
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 10:53:48 -0500, knuttle

You could rig up a relay and microswitch which will cut power to that circuit when the door is all the way up, bumping the microswitch. Add it after the switch so normal switch action is uninterrupted.
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 10:53:48 -0500, knuttle

I forgot to ask: How often do you want both the door open -and- the lights on? It wouldn't seem to be necessary very often.
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
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You mean on the (thin strip of) "wall" rather than the overhead ceiling, right?
Bill
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On 11/30/2010 1:29 PM, Bill wrote:

Mine are on the ceiling, not the wall.
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On 11/30/2010 3:06 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

Thank you. Bill
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wrote:

I mean that you should put lights on the ceiling above the area the door opens to. Just Do It!
-- Happiness is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling. -- Margaret Lee Runbeck
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Typical garage door needs a significant amount of clearance from the ceiling - there should be plenty of room for lights there - climb up a ladder and measure it. You can also mount them on the garage door tracks if you are capable of a little metalwork and pay attention to where you can attach stuff without mucking up door operation. Those would not be blocked by the door (but they will be its full width apart.) Fairly rare for most of us to have lights on and door open at same time, in practice (even if the weather is nice, the bugs fly into the lights, and garage-door-size screen doors are a significant hassle/project.)
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Yes, I will. It's just that getting electricity to that precise spot isn't as simple as it may seem on the Internet! : )
Unfortunately, I think even a good description of the mess involved would pale in comparison to the actual mess...
Maybe there is an easier way...I need to investigate further and see.
Bill

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It doesn't look all that sexy. But is is often done in shops. Not much mess with that approach. Just find the wood behind the drywall to attach the conduit. Conduit attaches easily to the outlet boxes. Lights and outlets can them be added to the outlet boxes.
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On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 22:14:51 -0500, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

There ya go, painting the conduit white to match. It will hide up there fairly well. (Nah, I'd put it up behind the drywall.)
And branch the second light string from the first.
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you never run romex in conduit!!! You run multistrand wires in conduit.
On 11/30/2010 10:14 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

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says...

Instead, you run Romex in a chase made out of EMT.

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On Wed, 01 Dec 2010 16:34:59 -0500, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote:

Never say never - in industry everything in conduit is separate conductors, but NMS cable in conduit for protection is rather common in residential applications. And it DOES meet code.

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