Ambient air cleaners

I hope that this post doesn't get lost among all the OTs and troll posts whcih seem to be appearing lately in great number.
After spending a few days cleaning my shop and equipment of fine dust particles, I am considering buying an air cleaner. I would appreciate comments from other wreckers who have them as to their operation. Are they a worthwhile investment? Perhaps I should just buy a better bag for my large DC. All comments and advice gratefully received. Thanks.
Peace ~ Sir Edgar
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 23:08:56 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Sir Edgar) Crawled out of the shop and said. . .:

a bigger bag will increase your CFM slightly, but unless you get a smaller micron bag, it might actually increase your post DC airborne particulate matter. if you get a bag with a better filter rating, you can clean up alot.
as for air exchanger, i built mine. get yourself a squirle cage fan motor, and mount it into a box, about 20"x12"x30". enclose all but two opposing sides, mount the blower inside so it can exhaust out through a hole in an adjacent side to the open sides. build a track to hold a furnace filter, (i use the fancy 3M ones, spendy, but cheaper than a new set of lungs)over both open ends of the box.then, mount it to the ceiling. i figure it changes the air in my shop about 7 times an hour, but i have a real small shop.
i DID notice a large difference in the dust that settles on things since i built it.
YMMV, good luck
Traves
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On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 00:04:55 -0500, Traves W. Coppock
[snip]

What did you use for the track? Something pre-fabbed?
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I've got one of those overhead air filters with a prefilter and 3 legged'sock' in it run form a squirrel cage fan. It made a world of difference! Some of the best money I've spent,esp. if you have to stain/finish your projects in the same shop.Mine's mounted halfway down the long side of the shop over where the RAS was, this way is catches most of the fine stuff from the 'sanding' station to the left of it. Always let it run 1/2 to 1 hour after your done for the day, and turn it on before you start as well. A DC only gets the 'big' stuff from around the machine(s) not the airborn 'floaters', but a better filter is worth the extra money there as well.
hth Jay
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 23:08:56 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Sir Edgar) wrote:

I just installed a Jet AFS-1000B, that I picked up for $199.
I wish I did this before I bought my DC. When using my table saw and miter saw, I was always able to see a fine dust hanging in the air that the DC didn't suck in. No more! The air seems to clear almost instantly.
Even though I've only had it a week, I notice much less throat irritation and sneezing towards the end of a long session.
I have the air cleaner mounted against one wall, about 1/3 of the way towards the end of the shop, with a helper fan located diagonally across the shop. This creates a noticeable circular current.
I normally run the unit on low, kicking it up to high via the remote, when I start sawing.
Barry
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Barry ~ Would you please tell me where you obtained your Jet AFS-1000B? Thanks.
Peace ~ Sir Edgar
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On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 09:35:08 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Sir Edgar) wrote:

The Manchester, CT Woodcraft store. He's got an unadvertised special @ $199 for the AFS-1000B.
According to the manager, when the stock is depleted. the price goes back to $239. They had five in stock a week or two ago.
Barry
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I also purchased the Jet 1000 about a year ago. It works very well - no doubt about it. There was an article in one of the trades within the past year that did a comparison on about 6 models. Don't remember the ratings but only one of them was rated as don't waste your money - the others were all okay. The Jet was dinged for not having a flat foam seal around where the filters set against the frame. A dollar, three, ninety-eight spent on some self-sticking, 3M high-density foam seal from the borg cured that.
At the time I got mine, Jet did not offer a washable, electrostatic filter for the model 1000. They may now but I haven't checked. I soon found that those filters can get expensive and that they're a non-standard size but you can get that size at the borgs. Delta does make a washable electrostatic filter that sells for around $49 and I got one of those after about two months. It "appears" to work as good or better as the throw away filters but I don't have any proof other than my judgment on that. I do use a pre-filter in front of it (sort of a belt and suspenders kinda thing) using one of the filters I got from the borg. You can also buy filters that you cut to size but I haven't needed to try that.
All in all - I'm satisfied with its performance and its hard to go wrong with any one of them. You will notice a big difference and it's also good for moving the air around in the shop to help keeps cooler.
Try the AW site to see if they have the reviews.
Bob S.
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wrote:

My brand new AFS-1000B has a foam seal. Maybe Jet listened?
Barr
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Good ! Thanks for the update.
in message

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Thanks for all the prompt responses and the good advice contained therein. I read them all at breakfast this morning. I think that I wll start looking for a suitable air cleaner to save my 79 year old lungs. Also I will consider buying a better filter bag for my Delta DC. Peace to all ~ Sir Edgar
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On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 09:22:28 -0400 (EDT), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Sir Edgar) wrote:

going to get into your lungs. the only real solution is to vent the air outside to replace the old or to work on a better DC system and catch the dust at it's source. using a really good filter on the dc really helps. but having enough airflow and redesigning the dc on machines so you get all of the dust takes care of the problem. I don't have dust flying all over my shop anymore and I don't need the air cleaner sitting in the corner now. I make more fine dust then most people as I use tropicals so much. padouk is about the worst at making extremely fine dust. a home built cyclone with good cartridge filters and well designed collection does far better then when my dc was outside the shop and was not designed well enough to get all of the dust.
--
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Sir Edgar wrote:

..could not resist that...
I run a dust collector... and also a ceiling mounted Delta air filter and a floor mounted (home made) air filter and my shop is a heck of a lot cleaner then it has ever been...
If you are 79 years old I guess you must want to hit 100 ... I myself am a young 60... and my reason for installing the dust collectors and air filters is only to have a nice clean relaxing place to goof off in..(my shop)... I honestly am not interested in protecting my health...I am at the point in my life where being above ground and breathing each morning is enough to ensure I have a good day...
Bob Griffiths (sitting here drinking a cup of coffee and smoking yet another cigarette...
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2003 23:08:56 -0400, Sir Edgar wrote:

I'm following the lead of a friend of mine. He built his out of plywood and bits found at flea markets. His air filters are standard furnace air filters.
Basic design includes a blower (used) and a motor (from an old dryer) connected with a fan belt. Plywood structure encasing the blower & motor with a slot that fits a standard dollar store furnace filter beside the blower's intake.
I think he said it cost him around $10 (Canadian), a couple hours building, and part of a day rummaging around a yard sales and flea markets. The latter he does anyway.
It seems to work quite well, the dust and other particles that make it into the air do end up lining the air filters. My nose notices the difference when it isn't turned on. How it compares to a commercial unit, I can't say.
Carolyn
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Here is the one I built about 10 years ago and still use. I stack 3 filters on top of each other on each side. The inner filter still picks up fine dust. I use the floor joist (basement shop) to duct clean air over the tablse saw. If I had it to do over, I'd go to bigger filters. Mine are 16" x 20", and a dust for a 3rd set of filter on the floor. When I do a lot of work (not dust collector) I see a trail of dust on the floor of particles that made it to the floor. Look at the bottom of this web page:
http://webpages.charter.net/pminmo/wood1.htm
Sir Edgar wrote:

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I have the larger Jet air cleaner. I don't recall the modle number. It came with a disposable pre- filter that has been replaced with an washable electrostatic filter.The air cleaner is equipted with an additional optional charcoal filter that is also effective in picking up organic smells. I have used the air cleaner for about two years now. I am very pleased with it. It is mounted from the celing in the center of the shop (size 24' X24'). It is so quite while it is on that I tend to forget it is running. Because it is so quite I try to remember to turn it on when I first go into the shop by setting the on/off timer so that I will not leave the shop with it running.
An air cleaner will not substitute for a good dust collection system. If you don't have a good dust collecting system get one before you buy an air cleaner. The air cleaner working with a dust collection system will remove almost all of the airborne dust particles that your normal shop operations create that a good dust collection system misses. No system that I am aware of is going to keep ALL of the fine dust form setteling on horizontal surfaces after prolonged shop operations. The Jet air cleaner will remove almost all *airborne* dust particles but I have found that after a few days of shop operations I start to notice fine dust particles in paticular on the floor and other horizontal surfaces even though the dust collector and the air cleaner have been running while the shop is in operation. I have discovered that an effective way to combat this is to use a blast of air form the air gun that is connected to my air compressor. I first vaccum the floor with a vaccum that is equipted with a clean stream filter and use the air gun to stir up the small dust particles that remain on the other horizontal surfaces and open shelves that are difficult to vaccum. The object is to get them airborne again or for them to fall back onto the floor form shelves and other horzontal surfaces such as workbench tops. By the way don't stir up the dust until you are ready to leave for the day! Leave the air cleaner on for a couple of hours after this procedure. When you return the fine dust will have been picked up by the air cleanre or will have settled onto the floor where you can easily get at it with a shop vaccum. If you do this, you will need to clean the washable electorstatic prefilter much more frequently.
I clean the shop prior to any spray painting that I do (includes a second vaccuming of the floor to remove any remaining dust particles that might become airborne due to me moving around in the shop). I run the air cleaner 30 minutes or more prior to the painting after everything has been vaccumed up. The air cleaner does such a good job of removing dust particless that I never have to worry about dust nibbs becoming attached to my freshly painted surfaces. I also run the air cleaner continuously while the paint is drying.
I am very pleased with the air cleaner. Used with a dust collection system it lets me keep a very clean shop with minimum effort.
I hope that this post doesn't get lost among all the OTs and troll posts whcih seem to be appearing lately in great number.
After spending a few days cleaning my shop and equipment of fine dust particles, I am considering buying an air cleaner. I would appreciate comments from other wreckers who have them as to their operation. Are they a worthwhile investment? Perhaps I should just buy a better bag for my large DC. All comments and advice gratefully received. Thanks.
Peace ~ Sir Edgar
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