AMAZING PLYWOOD CUTTING FACT

Got two 4X8 sheets of plywood today at Lowes. Making some stacking shelves for the shop, and had them slice them for me.
Getting them sliced into pieces 11 7/8", figuring about 1/8" for the cut, would give 7 pieces at 11 7/8" and 1 at slightly wider, per sheet. Well, that's always the way it worked before. Not today.
Usually they measure each cut individually, and don't use a stop block. Last time I wound up with one piece at 10 7/8" and one at approx 14", because of doing it this way.
So, this time I insisted on them using a stop block. No prob, right? Yeah, right.
I watched the guy measure the first cut, it was right on. I watched him put in the stop block, it was right on. I watched the pieces get cut. No prob. I looked at the pieces after they were cut. I couldn't believe it.
The first sheet went well. The second sheet went well. Then I got to eyballing the pieces. The last cut from the first sheet was about 2 inches narrower than the first 7. OK, I can live with that. Don't know how it happened, but, I can live with it. But, the last cut from the second sheet was only about 3 inches wide. I sorta felt like standing there, using my finger on my lips, and going brrrrrr.
The guy didn't use a clamp on the stop block. He used a spring clamp. The only thing I can figure is, every time he slid the rest of the sheet in place, for another cut, he moved the stop block just a bit. So, now I know to either, let them measure each cut individually, or, if they use a stop block, to have them use a C clamp on it.
I can use all the pieces, with only a minor bit of extra waste. That, and the fact that I was already in a hurry, decided me to just go ahead and take them.
It really amazed me tho. I thought no one was going to screw up using a stop block. Especially since I was right there watching, and seeing that it was done right. But, it's like they say, anything that can be screwed up, will be screwed up, sooner or later. I'm just happy I can use it as is. I'd have hated standing around in there while they cut two new sheets, and too even more time.
I can carry full size sheets in my pickup, but it's a real problem for me anymore, handling a full size sheet, and especially at home, and setting one up to cut. But, I've been thinking that if I could just get the sheets into the truck, no prob from there on. I could get them home, pull them a foot or so out of the truck, and use a saw guide to slice them to size, right on the tailgate. Maybe rest them on a couple of pieces of 2X4, so the blade has clearance.
Oh yeah, the guy that cut for me, well, two guys actually, one was in his 30s, and the other probably somewhere between 25 and 30, no little teenager. Amazing.
JOAT If history repeats itself, I should think we can expect the same thing again. - Terry Venables
Life just ain't life without good music. - JOAT Web Page Update 25 Sep 2003. Some tunes I like. http://community-2.webtv.net/Jakofalltrades/SOMETUNESILIKE /
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Jack-of-all-trades - JOAT wrote:

JOAT, some people can screw up a wet dream.
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Next time leave 'em. I nearly always come away from Lowes with free ply from the cut off can.

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On Sat, 27 Sep 2003 01:17:04 GMT, "Tom Whatley"

My local Lowes and HD both have "No Precision Cuts" signs posted. You can still leave 'em, but you will have paid for them.
Barry
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On Sat, 27 Sep 2003 03:18:22 GMT, B a r r y B u r k e J r .

My plywood dealer (very up-market, but good prices) will happily cut to any reasonable precision you like, so long as it's during the week and you phone ahead - which might take a day or two, if they're busy cutting other jobs. Turn up on a Saturday morning and ask them "just to rip a sheet in half so it fits in the car", then you'll get within 1/4"
But not clamping a stop block properly is cock-up, not inaccuracy. -- Smert' spamionam
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Are you positive that the sheet(s) were 4x8 to start with? I bought some 3/4" 4x8 (so I thought) plywood T&G for the flooring in my 12x16 shop. Turns out they were 8' long all right, but were not 4' wide, about 1" narrower. Really pissed me off because I then had a 2" gap along the 16' side & had to buy another sheet of that shit to fill it in. Of course I didn't notice it until I'd already liquid nailed and screwed 2 sheets of the flooring down & layed out the 3rd.
Jack-of-all-trades - JOAT wrote:

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Fri, Sep 26, 2003, 7:38pm (EDT-2) jsdebooATcomcast.net (Grandpa) asks: Are you positive that the sheet(s) were 4x8 to start with? <snip>
Yes. But wouldn't matter anyway, because both were the same size. So all the cuts should have came out the same, but didn't.
JOAT If history repeats itself, I should think we can expect the same thing again. - Terry Venables
Life just ain't life without good music. - JOAT Web Page Update 25 Sep 2003. Some tunes I like. http://community-2.webtv.net/Jakofalltrades/SOMETUNESILIKE /
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"Grandpa" <jsdebooATcomcast.net> wrote in message

Actually about 1/2 or 5/8" narrower, Grandpa. The sheet started life as 4' x 8', then they milled the tongue on the edge. The overall sheet is still 4x8, but when put together with others, they don't cover 4' each. Got caught on this one myself when we started rebuilding the front porch 2-3 yrs. ago, had to do some fast re-framing of the floor joists! Nahmie
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I think the joists still should be on some divisor of 96, such as 12, 16, or 24, since the length of the sheets should be perpendicular to the joists. Also, don't pack the tongue and grove too tight, unless you enjoy the musicality of a squeaking floor.
--
Alex
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True, but in this case the size/layout of the porch floor dictated long sides parallel to joists. Nahmie
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used in that manner? -- Jim in NC
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I went to Home Depot a little while ago and had a 10ft board cut to 6ft because that's all I wanted. When I took it to the cashier she measured it and it was 6ft, 2in long. She pulled out a chart and wanted to charge me for the extra 2in. I told her that she could take it back to the saw, not charge me for the 2in or I was leaving and would go to Loews across the street. She just charged me for the 6ft and that was that. Peace ~ Sir Edgar
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I woul have had them cut each in two. I can handle 2 x 8, but not 4 x 8.
Jack-of-all-trades - JOAT wrote:

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Joat, I don't know what size pickup you have but I have a Ranger (and an S10 before that) I have a "rack" in the bed so i can carry sheet goods flat, keeps them above the wheel well. I have them load it onto one of the horizontal carts, unless i have someone with me. from there it is fairly easy to get it into the truck. When i get it home, I slide it out part way, support the cutoff with a saw horse and cut with a guide.
the rack helps considerably both in transport and in cutting to manageable size (accurately).
BRuce
Jack-of-all-trades - JOAT wrote:

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BRuce


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