alternatives for sealing between rough opening and window and door sills/frames

Page 1 of 2  
i used the usual low expansion foam from a can and was reminded my love hate relationship of that stuff
my first mistake was to not use up the entire can at one time and i tried using it the next day but no go
tried with a new nozzle from another can too
the job is done now but i wonder if there are alternatives to this foam the product was a dow product
i would not mind something that expanded really slow or even a two part solution from cans or tubes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Electric Comet wrote:

I don't fill it, no point, covered up by the casing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, June 6, 2015 at 3:17:18 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

No point? Unless you are caulking both your interior and exterior casing so completely as to create a dead air space, you have no insulation. You actually have a bunch of holes in your house.
Am I missing something?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyDad03 wrote:

the willies to see a new house hermetically sealed with plastic "wrap". I would not want to live in a house where closing the door makes your ears pop. What about the gasses generated by the occupants, cooking, cleaners and the outgassing of paint, etc? A little air exchange with the outside seems to me to be a good thing.
--
GW Ross

Real women don't deflate when you bite
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here in Washington state we have fresh air ventilation requirements in the building code. For homes with a central heat source, this is usually accomplished with an air-to-air heat exchanger. But we have individual room heaters so that approach wasn't an option.
Basically, we had to seal up the house tightly, caulking all gaps, etc.
Then to counteract that sealed effect we had to install a ventilation fan to exhaust air out of the house and all of the windows had to have air vents at the top to let fresh air in. The fan is on a timer so it runs about 12 hours a day to pull fresh air through the house.
It seems counter productive, but our house always smells fresh, never stuffy like our old houses. Despite the vents at every window, our heating bills are lower than our previous house that was half the size.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 8 Jun 2015 13:09:42 +0000 (UTC)

if you have a window why not just open it i do not understand a window with a vent
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, June 8, 2015 at 11:17:47 AM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

http://i60.photobucket.com/albums/h25/boilerman90/window011.jpg
Just kidding.
I'm guessing that the fan/window vent system is automatic. When the exhaust fan turns on, the suction causes the vent to open, allowing fresh air to enter.
Imagine something similar in the exhaust vent for a dryer or bathroom fan installed backwards. Closed when the fan is off, open inwards when the fan is on.
Perhaps HerHusband can confirm.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

One, the vent works without having to manually do anything.
Two, the window can be closed and locked for security and still have ventilation.
Three, the vent is small, probably less than 1"x16" at the top of the window. Cracking the window even a tiny bit would be a much bigger opening.

Actually the system is very simple, much easier than I pictured when we were building the house and faced with the Washington energy code. We had to pay a bit more to have the vents added to the windows, but it was a minor cost difference.
The top rail of the windows is an inch or so taller, with a little screened vent running across the window. If you look at the very last picture on my house web page, you can see the vented windows on the right side of the house. Compare those to two non-vented windows on the front of the house, either side of the arched window. Visually, it's not a big difference.
http://www.watsondiy.com/2003house.htm
Inside the house each vented window has a little slider that can open and close, but we always leave the vents open for the fresh air, even on the coldest winter days. The vents are hidden behind the blinds, so we can't see them anyway (see the two side windows in the picture with the green couches). Otherwise, there are no flaps or other moving parts to the window vents.
As for the ventilation fan, it's just a standard fan like you would install in a bathroom. The only requirement was that it be installed on a timer so it would continue to run even if someone turned it off. Any of the bathroom ventilation fans would comply, but I designated the fan in the laundry room as the whole house fan.
Even though the fan is in the laundry room behind a closed door, our Panasonic vent fans are practically silent when running. So noise has not been an issue.
Finally, there has to be a 1" gap at the bottom of the doors so air can flow from room to room. Not an issue since they're usually cut to clear carpets and whatnot anyway.
They do make special wall vents that can be used instead of the window vents. But, I didn't want a bunch of holes in the walls or vents lining the outside of the house. The window vents just look better.
I had my doubts when we were installing everything, but I have been surprised how well it works to keep the air fresh in the house.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Monday, June 8, 2015 at 3:38:08 PM UTC-4, HerHusband wrote:

re: "Inside the house each vented window has a little slider that can open and close"
I've seen these types of vents, but I'm surprised that they were "allowed" based your codes.
They force you to have a fan, they force you have a timer on that fan, and (I think) they force you have a 1" gap on the bottom of the doors, yet they allow you to install vents that can be closed? Doesn't that seem a little odd?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yep, it does sound kind of odd, though the vents aren't exactly air tight when closed.
As I said, we just leave ours open all of the time. Unless we stand directly in front of the window, we can't feel any air coming through the vent even on a cold windy day.
Ironically, most people would probably close the vents in the winter when there's a greater need to bring fresh air into the building (since windows aren't opened as often).
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 8 Jun 2015 19:36:49 +0000 (UTC)

glass window closed versus open does not present a big difference in security

it all sounds overly complicated
what ever happened to throwing on a sweater when it gets cold and opening a window for some air
i am now wondering what code hoops you would have to jump through if you want a fireplace to burn real wood
or is that not allowed anymore
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Small vents to let fresh air in, a small fan to push stale air out, and a timer to make sure it isn't turned off. Seems rather simple to me.

We had no problems with our woodstove permit and installation.
Other than the usual distances from combustible materials and clearances for the chimney, the only requirement was a separate air intake for the stove. Basically so it pulls in outside air instead of pulling air from the conditioned space. All that took was a small metal duct and a hole in the floor to our crawl space.
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 9 Jun 2015 05:18:52 +0000 (UTC)

just more stuff to break

there is hope then
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/6/2015 2:21 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

compressed insulation material into the gaps. Not as absolute a seal as foam but, if done properly, it can minimize heat flow pretty effectively.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/6/2015 1:21 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

A touch of acetone will clean the product out of the application tube and the tip coming out of the can before it cures. Very similar as cleanup of polyurethane glue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
They do sell long ropes of differing sizes of foam. I like these. One can purchase at a less expensive cost. They store. You use a larger that "crack size" and stuff it in. If the space is bigger you can double it up. It tears with a quick rip. I get tired of these miracle foams and sealants that seem to always end up on your pants, window, or tools. Yes, the low expansion product is better. I believe they have a water clean up foam also. The cans only hold so much.
John
"Electric Comet" wrote in message
i used the usual low expansion foam from a can and was reminded my love hate relationship of that stuff
my first mistake was to not use up the entire can at one time and i tried using it the next day but no go
tried with a new nozzle from another can too
the job is done now but i wonder if there are alternatives to this foam the product was a dow product
i would not mind something that expanded really slow or even a two part solution from cans or tubes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
will try this next time combined with some cheap sealant
didn't know they had a water clean up foam only saw this one brand in different varieties
low expansion high for large gap, etc.
On Sun, 7 Jun 2015 06:44:17 -0700

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 7 Jun 2015 06:44:17 -0700

i just noticed that this "great stuff" have an expiration date on it and was unplesantly surprised that the date has come and gone
i did not check at the store but i should have i had a few cans of it and the dates were from 6 mos. to more than a year until expiration
the moral of the story is either use poly foam caulk saver rope or buy this stuff they day before and use the whole can
and wear gloves and eye protection
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've always considered the stuff to be one-time use. The little cans may cost more per ounce, but are cheaper considering the waste. The foam always sealed the nozzle shut and if you removed it would seal the can itself shut.
I'd keep more of it around if it wasn't for that problem.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/8/15 10:30 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I use cans for multiple uses by cleaning out the nozzle and tube with brake cleaner. It's dissolves the stuff on contact.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.