Alkyd paint vs semi gloss latex on birch plywood?

I recently completed a storage unit made from birch plywood. Based on things I have read in this newsgroup in the past, I used an alxyd primer followed by two coats of semi-gloss alkyd paint. I found the alkyd paint to be thick enough where I saw brush marks in a few places after it dried. Probably nobody but me will notice but you know how it is - you want your project to be as perfect as you can. I choose alkyd because it really dries hard so I shouldn't see marks from things sitting on top of the storage unit. If you have done something similar would you have thinned it a little or would you have used the semi gloss latex?
TIA.
Dick Snyder
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If it could go in a gun, I would spray it. Unless you are going to rub out a finish, that is the only way to get completely around brush marks.
A couple of other things. Did you use the correct brush? For oil based paints or finishes you should use a natural bristle brush. Your paint store can put you in the right area for this kind of brush. Contrary to popular belief, natural hair/bristle will last for years when properly cleaned and stored.
And for me, I use Glidden industrial alkyd the most, and to have a chance at a smooth finish I thin it by 10% to brush, a little more to spray. Call the number on the can to see what tech support says or call a paint store. Note I keep saying paint store, not the big box's paint dept.
Give your project about 3 weeks to fully cure, then sand with 320 to remove those brush strokes. When you have it smooth (remember that any irregularities you leave behind will come right on through the new coat) try another coat of thinned material with the correct brush.
Just my 0.02.
Robert
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And a very helpful $.02 it was. I don't have a gun but I did use a natural bristle brush. I've had it for 5+ years at least. I used Ben Moore as I wanted to match the color of the walls behind the project which were done with a Ben Moore latex. I guess the short answer is to thin it some but at least I can fix it up in another week.
Thanks for your helpful advice!
Dick

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Dick Snyder wrote:

I hate latex, but for flat on walls. I would definitely use alkyd on furniture that takes any kind of wear. Let it cure completely, then sand with fine sandpaper. Get some Penetrol to thin the paint, per label instructions. If you have totally flat surfaces, you might get better results using a foam roller.
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Thu, Feb 22, 2007, 3:15pm snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (DickSnyder) doth queryeth: <snip> If you have done something similar would you have thinned it a little or would you have used the semi gloss latex?
100 acrylic latex, yes.
JOAT When in doubt, go to sleep. - Mully Small
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