air vs electric

was looking at an orbital air sander and the claim was that it did a better job then similar electric sander
the only thing i could think of that would be different was that it was higher rpms but my electric goes plenty fast
marketing claim or is there really something to it
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Electric Comet wrote:

It's the size of the swirls it cuts.
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American Woodworker did a review of palm sanders years ago, and included 2 or 3 air models in their selection.
As I recall, they found the air sanders, to be lighter, easier on the hands because of less vibration, and more powerful. They also noted the possibility of getting lube oil on the work from the air exhaust (I guess they had an in-line oiler in the air system they were using).
John
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On 7/17/2016 9:44 AM, John McCoy wrote:

I would imagine that for the average woodworker with out a 60 gallon plus compressor tank that the volume necessary for an air sander would be out of reach except for a few seconds of use at a time.
Air consumption of one of the Mirka air sanders is 475 l/min. IMHO a 25 gallon compressor is not going to be able to keep up.
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On 7/17/2016 2:48 PM, Leon wrote:

I have a 30 gallon and it can't keep up with my (old) Milwaukee air sander. I guess it depends more on the compressor than the tank though. Has no dust collection either, so it never, ever gets any use.
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Jack
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On 7/21/2016 11:14 AM, Jack wrote:

Precicely, I kinda lumped them all in the same type category. It is all about the CFM of the pump and not so much the tank size. But for the most part the bigger the tank the less the pump has to recharge.
I once bought an 80 gallon compressor from a garage sale, it had a tiny single piston pump. It literally took approximately 45 minutes to fill from no pressure. Obviously it was a "piece it together" affair. I was glad to sell it and downsize to a "New" compressor 20 years ago. LOL
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