Air Nailer Adjustments....

Have a new Bostitch framing nailer. I still have a problem with some double firing etc...How much does air pressure matter? I am only using 75psi for a framing nailer. It's within the proper range. SHould I use MORE pressure?
What else is there? I use plenty of pressure, I lean heavy onto the naile when I fire....
Should I set the depth a little less? Or more?
I'm sort of new to this framing nailer stuff....
Thanks!
Elmar
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I only seem to double nail because of a spastic finger. I have shot more than a few boxes of nails through my Paslode freaminf gun and rarely if ever double nail. Double nail with the Paslode trim gun and you get jammed nails. The roofing nail gun does do some double nailing but once again it is in the fingers.
I think if you squeeze and hold it will fire one nail. I suspect you squeeze and nervously expect somethng you end up squeezing again. Make sure you are hangin on to the gun with your three free fingers and the thumb, not the trigger finger. Or fire a case and you will probalby figure out the technique. The nail bun can bounce off the work after firng a nail. If you are hangin on to the trigger when it rests back on the work it can fire another nail. Once again you have to release the trigger. A little bounce after firing a nail is no big deal. You do not have to have death grip for the gun to properly fire a nail.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Elmar) wrote:

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I bet you get/purchase a "single fire" trigger for that gun. PC offers one for free for their framers.
Elmar wrote:

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Correct. This is not an air pressure problem. There are two types of triggers - restrictive/single fire (one nail per pull of the trigger, no matter what the nailer does) and bounce/bottom fire (one nail per depression of the nose safety as long as the trigger is held). Framing nailers are not designed for precision nail placement, just close enough. There are two choices: a) get the single-fire trigger - it won't slow you down that much, but the trigger finger will get more exercise; b) learn how to bounce-fire the nailer - do not contact the wood surface before nailing. Hold the trigger closed and push the nailer toward the area to be nailed from a few inches out. Pull it back after the nail is discharged. Release the trigger if another nail is not desired immediately in the same area.
On Tue, 07 Sep 2004 20:14:38 GMT, Pat Barber

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Your gun most likely is fine. As another responder wrote, you can get a sequential trigger that will only fire one nail at a time (after the safety is depressed, the trigger will only shoot one nail, then the safety has to be released and depressed again, and pull the trigger to fire) What you have is a "bump fire" or "safety fire" which allows you to fire as many nails as you want by holding the trigger in and bumping the safety on your target. If you are inexperienced with framing guns, this can be a real safety issue. The optional trigger is usually free if you contact Bostich and are easy to replace. It will make the gun operate slower, but if you are not using it in a production environment it'll be fine. As far as it double firing, most guns will until the operator gets more experience with it.-- Heck, I use a framing nailer almost everyday and still double fire occasionally! BTW Treat that gun as you would a real gun-keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot a nail, keep you other hand away from where you are shooting, and wear safety glasses. I have seen many bad things happen due to carelessness with a framing gun. --dave

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On 7 Sep 2004 09:39:31 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Elmar) wrote:

I run my framing gun about 90 psi. it's an old paslode, so that data point may not be relevant to your gun.
on every gun I've used, it seems like underpressuring it leads to the piston not fully retracting after driving a nail, which means next time you try to shoot one you have to hit it twice- once to finish the previous cycle, then again to drive a nail. I have never seen double firing that I could attribute to too low of line pressure.
It's probably technique. try a lighter touch- that is, don't lean into the gun when bounce nailing. let the recoil push the gun away from the wood. when you're trying for precise placement rather than bounce nailing, set the nose where you want the nail and depress the tip with your fingers off of the trigger, then twitch the trigger once and release, again letting the recoil push the gun away from the wood.
Practise, practise....

don't lean heavy into the nail. there's your problem right there....

set the depth so that the head of the nail is just below the surface...

it has a rythm.
boinka boinka boinka boinka boinka...

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Within limits, it would be desirable for you to observe a professional framing crew operate a framing nailer, both roof framing (1-3 nails at a burst) or subfloor attachment (more nails driven consecutively).
Observe how they use framing hammers on the job as well. Typically 20-23 ounce heads, straight claw and 16" handles.
One caution - since the nail is driven in a single stroke, be aware of the angle of the nailer to the surface. Either hold it square to the surface (avoids having the point blow out the side of the second piece of wood) or move over so that the nail point still ends up completely enclosed in the second piece of wood (as in toenailing).
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I've been using bostich guns for near 20 yrs. I've always run them at 90+ PSI (usually right at 120). The prior recommendations for a safety trigger are a good idea for a beginner with no experienced advisors. IMO, underpressure leads to repeated fire - with high pressure, the gun recoils cleanly from the work. Learn to slip your finger off the trigger to prevent undesired fastening:)

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Thanks for all of the great repsonses. I've tried everything but the air pressure adjustment. I've even purposefully pulled and released the trigger as quickly as possible.
I printed a manual from Bostitch since I bought a refurb that did not come with one. Indeed I do have the contact trip, BLACK, trigger.
So I e-mailed them to find out how to get a sequential for it. I feel that would be safer.
I will play with the airpressure this weekend. I will crank up the air a little bit and play with the depth to compensate for the increase in pressure.
I am nearly done framing the shed, so I may even sell the gun. I am not sure if I plan on building more. I was considering doing some side work for a little extra money.
Thanks again!
Elmar

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