AIR LINES

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I was into a Amish window factory the other day and their air lines caught my eye. They used 3" PVC pipe for all their air lines suspended from the ceiling with supports and T's with snap couplers at all the work stations. They used brass gas line couplers for shut offs for the various branches. A 8" pressure gauge noted 145# PSI at the end of the line. What are the Plusses for this type of system other than the line acting as a storage media? I didn't see any water separators and was wondering if they were using a engine driven compressor in the cold and drawing cold air into the compressor and bringing it in a warm shop what effect this type of line would have?
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Interesting.
If that is 3" DWV pipe, I don't think I'd go back in there. I understand it isn't good for pressure lines, and will shatter and blow plastic shrapnel all over the place.
And they don't use it in the summer when it is warm and humid?
Old Guy

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BT98 wrote:
> I was into a Amish window factory the other day and their air lines > caught my eye. They used 3" PVC pipe for all their air lines > suspended from the ceiling with supports and T's with snap couplers at > all the work stations.
That's a bomb waiting to explode.
Definitely would not catch me in the place.
BTW, the concept is good, it's the PVC that is a problem.
Lew
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I checked out the pipe at Home Depot and the PSI ratings on this pipe and it is almost double than what they are running on it. It looked like the outside diameter was about 3 inch. This place is on the corner of 700 and Shed road. That may be in Burton, Ohio.
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The problem is that most PVC pipe is not UV stabilized.
If it's painted or enclosed, great. If not, it probably gets brittle with age.
I lost count of how many PVC shop aids, truck racks, work stands, storage devices, etc... that I made that became brittle and simply crumpled with sunlight exposure.
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Pressure ratings for PVC are given for liquids not air. Couple that with the damage from UV on those pipes and it's tendency to go brittle with time, and well, let's just say I wouldn't use PVC for air lines.
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But is that water or air rating? When water bursts, it just flows out and does not have the explosive force of compressed air. Both OSHA forbids it and the makers of the pipe recommend against using it for air.
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A tractor service shop in town uses 1" CPVC for all their air lines. (the light tan stuff) They've used it for the last 18 years without incident. Their system is at 150 PSI leaving the compressor. Air is used for wrenches, tires, hammers, and etc. Parts of the system gets some direct sunlight when the bay doors are open. There are large skylights but they are corregated plexi and diffuse the light. They completely drain the system each night and power it back up each morning. I found it much less of a hassle to hang two reels, one at each end of my shop and connect them with air hoses. But then, I'm not working in a six bay shop, either. Gene

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It may go another 18 years but it can go tomorrow. There are real incidents of air lines rupturing and thus, the reason for not using it. http://www.osha.gov/dts/hib/hib_data/hib19880520.html
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You could say that driving drunk is not a good idea and someone would post saying how they know someone who has done it for 20 years. It still doesn't make it a good idea.

incidents
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Is the CPVC considered just as bad as PVC for air or ?? I know the regular plumbing grade CPVC is somewhat more flexible compared to PVC, perhaps it is less likely to shatter when it ruptures.
--
Better to be stuck up in a tree than tied to one.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf.lonestar.org
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Yes, cpvc is still pvc. Metal is good. Rubber is good.
On Mon, 5 Mar 2007 00:24:56 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Larry W) wrote:

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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Maybe it's ABS pipe instead?
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Unless this place was by a nicely moving creek and had either a waterwheel or a pack of apprentices taking turns on the bicycle powering the compressor, you wern't in an Amish shop.
:P

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I have heard that diesel engines are allowed. I will look into this.
r
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Robatoy wrote:

A few years back I stopped into an Amish woodworking shop In East Otto, NY and was surprised to see a brand new Unisaw in the shop. The owner must have read my face because the first thing he said is, "It's allowed as long as it isn't powered off the grid".
He was running it off a generator tied to a Chevy V8.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Many years ago, I think it was FWW which featured an article about an Amish shop which ran entirely off hydraulic and air motors. The main power plant was a diesel which ran compressors and/or hydraulic pumps, I am not entirely certain which was the main power supply. IIRC, the routers were air driven. Diesels do not require any electrical auxiliary equipment, and can be started off compressed air, which can either be saved from when the diesel last ran, or pumped up by hand. I was always under the impression that sharing a network of electrical devices with sinners was the reason for their prohibition.
r.
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Nova wrote:

It reminds me of my grandfather when one day we went to a store he had sworn he'd never use again: "Anger is one thing but business is business."
Sounds like the Amish are reaching a bit to justify what everybody else has already accepted: that we upgrade our circumstances as required. If the Amish were really as old fashioned as the stereotype would suggest, they'd walk instead of riding in one of those newfangled horse drawn carriages.
Practicality usually wins out.
--
Mortimer Schnerd, RN
mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com
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Mortimer Schnerd, RN wrote:

That's the thing, they aren't "old fashioned", just careful about what changes they make and when they make them.
They don't seem to be opposed to change, but they seem determined that they are going to control the changes rather than letting the changes control them. They don't forbid their people to have cars because cars are "newfangled", their reasons are more complex than that--they've watched what happened in the "English" world when everybody had cars and they aren't OK with it.
--
--
--John
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On Sun, 4 Mar 2007 06:33:34 -0500, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN" <mschnerdatcarolina.rr.com> wrote:>Nova wrote:

My understanding of their original reasoning was that something had to be found in scripture before they would use it. Thus, no buttons because buttons aren't in the Bible. Same thing with electricity and other modern conveniences. However, there are chariots and other horse-drawn conveyances mentioned in the Bible, thus, by default they were OK. It seems that they have made some accomodations more recently and as one poster has indicated, they are trying to be discerning on what they bring in to attempt to exclude what they view as negative influences.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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