Air Compressors

Finally upgrading the pancake compressor in my workshop to a much larger capacity and quieter model. Question is, which one?
I've seen several around town at the local BORG, Rockler, even Sams Club has a Coleman 25 gallon for $220. My only problem is I can't get anyone to let me plug em in and turn em on to see how quiet (or loud) it is. The Porter Cable pancake one I have is plenty loud, and I've read from the NG that oil-less compressors make for the loudest ones.
So question for the wreck, do you own a "quiet" (I know they're never really that quiet) compressor, and if so what make / model. I want to stay in the $200-300 price range, want a 20-25 gallon upright model, and something that's quiet or relatively quiet. Oil-less or oiled doesn't matter. I'll oil to get rid of some of the noise.
Thanks in advance, and yes I did do a google search.
Mike Rinken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If it helps, Porter Cable at least rates their compressors now for sound level. Try: http://www.portercable.com/index.asp?eT7&p%80 and zoom into one of the compressors (find yours?). Unfortunately, they don't choose to show it on the table of all compressors.
I'm with you, in terms of sound. Got a basement shop, and I've steered clear of getting a compressor because of the noise. Well, that and I haven't come up with a good excuse for SWMBO. :)
Clint

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Clint Neufeld wrote:

Interesting link. Two of their 25 gal, the upright with an oilless is rated at 90 dB and the horizontal with oiled is rated at 78 dB.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The generic 5-6 HP from HD or Lowes is fine. I have one in my basement and it's no problem, noise wise. Just watch for specials. At that size, it has to have 240V. It's amazing that they ar ehardly more than the little ones. If it don't have a belt, don't buy it! Wilson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Food for thought for you home workers and the sound of compressors. Best bet is and upright put in in a corner and build a 1x2 framed wall around it and insulate it including the top this will muffle the sound down pretty damn good. Also will keep the dirt out, try to get it near an outside wall and replumb the Air intake expanding it bigger with pipe reducers in the oppisite way of course and buy a totally differant filter for it, Many sizes in the Graingers catalogue. Pipe it to the outside and the elbow it downward so the intake is facing the ground. Your compressor is now sucking in outside air and weather cannot get into it. If I made this sound complicated it ain't write to me and I will e-mail you a sketch of what I mean.
Incidently when looking for a compressor do not look at PSI or the so called rated HP look for the CFM it produces Good Luck, George

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Piping your air intake to the outside will lead to far more moisture buildup in the compressor, at least in any parts of the country with high humidity levels. Plus temp change from outside air to inside will be another cause of moisture. But insulating with a wall is good for moise dampening, just don't make to small or heat will build up with heavy use.
Joe Ingham

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Following the recommendations of Ingersol Rand, our 150 HP compressor intake is outside. It runs 24 hours a day, 5 days a week. Temperature range can be below zero to 100 in the summer.
Condensation is normal during the compression of air. The air is also heated during the process so cooler air from outside is a benefit. The only time humidity levels make a difference is when the inside air is modified to reduce it. In a typical garage setup, the relative humidity is the same inside as outside. In a heated shop or basement, it may be lower in winter. Keep in mind though, humidity is "relative" to temperature (moisture holding capacity), actual humidity (moisture content) will have much less of an affect on the compression cycle. Ed.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If quiet is your top priority, have a look at this one:
http://www.portercable.com/index.asp?eT7&pG00
Its main advantage is it has a 1725rpm motor which makes much less noise than the typical 3650 rpm motor. It is oilless but has a two stage pump which fills the tank to a higher pressure (so there is more air available between fillings). I've seen them on sale for $360. Sears sells the same model (except black in color and with pneumatic wheels). It goes on sale for $380 regularly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
creamy@nospam_agbf1942.com says...

quieter than those that are not. In addition you will have a quieter compressor if you buy one that is constructed with more iron. When looking for a compressor, tale along a magnet and check the compressor pump. Those with iron cylinders, and blocks will be a feature to look for. The oil lubed compressors have a life span that is about 10 times that of oilless models.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't buy oilless, they are way too noisey, wish I never bought my Devilbiss upright, it is incredibly noisy and the motor gets smoking hot.
Blair
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

What he said. I didn't realize what I had done when I bought mine until it was too late. Dad's compressor was belt driven with a dignified quiet motor, imagine my shock when I plugged in my new oilless compressor, turned it on the first time and heard this horrendous loud pounding noise.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 03:38:37 GMT, Mark & Juanita

Some oilless units sould like there is something wrong with them.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.