Air Compressor


Need some opinions. Thinking of getting a upright stationary compressor (oil lubricated) and putting it in enclosure on the outside wall of my shop. Probable would insulate it but temperatures around here in winter that occaisionally drop below freezing. Would the cold cause any problems???
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On Mon, 12 Sep 2005 14:50:08 GMT, "BC Brian"

Draining the tank daily after use could be, you do need to eliminate the condesation in the tank to prevent early rusting.
Mark
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BC Brian wrote:

We use compressors on jobsites, most are similar to what you are talking about (oil lubed). When the temperature drops close to or below freezing, compressors have a hard time starting. We would generally build a fire and set the compressors and guns close to the fire to warm them up while we rolled out the rest of the tools. By the time we were ready to use them, they would work fine.
If you put it in an enclosure on the outside, put a light socket in there. If the temps are going to be low, put a 100 watt bulb in there and leave it on. Insulate the walls, but install a vent that can be opened and closed. You should have no problems.
As far as damage to the equipment from the cold weather, you should make sure to drain the tank regularly so as to avoid moisture buildup. The damage will occur if moisture in the lines freezes. The cold should not have a direct effect on the equipment, but ice in the tank or lines might.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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the oil bath crankcase in a compressor is similar to the one in a car engine. if it gets cold enough to keep the oil from flowing, running it will damage it.
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I ran an oil lubed compressor for years in the attic of my garage. I would change the oil spring and fall. Run normal weight oil in the summer, and thinner in the winter. Never had a problem except by spring I needed to drain the condensate, (ice!), from it that accumulated all winter! North Dakota winters! I see no problem with it as you are rarely seeing freezing temps.If you get a cast iron pump, you can buy a magnetic heater to stick on the pump. Greg
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