Aging "African Mahogany"


I am building a fireplace surround out of tile and african mahogany. The mahogany boards are of varing degrees of aging and therefore of varying degrees of color. I need to age them to a consistant color. I know they will eventually turn color but in the meantime I have to live with some light tan areas and some deep brown. Any suggestions? Leo
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Yep...put them in the sun light...of course that will cause other problems... You will need to tint,dye or stain that wood to get a constant color(which is what factories do).
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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Thanks, I knew you would say that. Probably by the time I get done planing they will all be about the same hue. I have used this stuff before and like the ribbon grain but sometimes the color is a problem. Leo
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Mahogany can be darkened with a dilute lye solution. Experiment with strength, but just a few percent worked well for me. The effect is instantaneous. Some will say you need to neutralize the lye with a weak acid, but I haven't found this necessary. I believe exposure to the air for a time will do it.
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On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 09:55:56 -0700, ed_h wrote:

Acids and bases don't just go away. It's possible that wood has some slight buffering capacity, but a splash of vinegar is easy and quick.
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On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 15:11:53 -0500, Australopithecus scobis

then what do you do to neutralize the vinegar?
<hint> most species of wood are mildly acidic as they come off of the tree.
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On Fri, 16 Sep 2005 14:08:01 -0700, bridger wrote:

The vinegar and the lye neutralize each other. Didn't know about the acidity of trees; thanks for the tidbit.
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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

I've never neutralized the lye, and haven't seen problems with finishes (the main concern, I think). Lye is a strong base, and I wouldn't be surprised if it would mess up the chemistry of a finish material. Lye loses strength when exposed, though. I suspect that the NaOH reacts slowly with atmospheric CO2, leaving sodium carbonate--a much more benign material.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

A potassium dichromate solution will help the color along. A good photo supply shop should have it.
John Martin
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