Aged finish techniques?

Hello,
I am about to attempt refinishing an old (not antique) kitchen table. The original linseed oil finish has seen better days and did not survive my kid nephews' treatment. I also am not a fan of the very yellow color the wood has taken.
I have seen some cool "aged" finishes on tables at stores. The tables have a natural finish and what almost looks like light scorch marks to give an aged effect. Anyone know what kind of finishing technique was used? Is fire actually used sometimes? Any recommended refinishing books?
Thanks! Greg
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No sweat, in spite of Mike, you can easily scrape/sand through that "penetrating finish," leaving some behind in the areas not normally subject to wear, or you can remove all the finish and follow a glazing regimen. Scorching is used sometimes - torch is what I've used -but it has a different effect on every wood. Open-grained woods almost reverse, with the softer and lighter-color earlywood becoming darker than the latewood. I would really rather use a leave-behind antiquing, or work a glaze, both of which are reversible, rather than scorch. If you do decide to use heat, scorch it with hot pans so as to get authentic-looking burns.

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If I paint a piece, I will put a contrasting color as a base coat, then the final color. Then using a rag and dark stain, I put streaks on the piece. You might wipe gently to soften the streaks. I also put a some holes in the piece with an awl and wipe stain on the holes then wipe off, leaving the holes dark. Wipe with the grain and feather, because some streaking will remain. I then sand a corner and edge or two, exposing the contrasting color and a little bare wood. I then apply a clear coat. I do the same for a stained piece, but I don't use a contrasting color.
Preston

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snipped-for-privacy@excite.com (Greg Jones) wrote:

IF it's and old look with cracks,etc., you put down one color if you want, then I think when that's dry, a coat of elmers white glue...and when that's dry, your top color which as it drys will produce the cracks if I remember right.
--
Regards,
JP
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Crackle finish is hide glue over base coat. Look for liquid hide glue, brown jug, with explanation on cardstock hung on lid. Maybe Franklins' site has steps.
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