Affixing moulding trim

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I'm looking to add some trim to my bookcase for decorative purposes to pretty things up. My question is how to attach the trim the carcass - just glue or glue and finish nails?
If finish nails, any advice on using them without a power/air nailer? I think I've heard to drill pilot holes (using an actual nail as the bit). Pilot holes through the trim and into the carcass?
Thanks
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scribbled:

I would use only glue, with masking tape to hold/clamp the trim in place until the glue dries. Nail holes are a PITA to fill & hide.
Luigi Replace "nonet" with "yukonomics" for real email address www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/antifaq.html www.yukonomics.ca/wooddorking/humour.html
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One good method for gluing is to use regular wood glue (your choice) and to leave some spots unglued for a drop of hot melt. The hot melt holds pretty tight until the regular wood glue sets up and you have to rely a lot less on tape and clamps. max

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And Titebond makes a moulding glue (maybe $4 for 8 oz bottle) for just this purpose.
Why a special glue? It doesn't run. It dries clear and rubbery, so if you miss the squeeze out, you can trim it off within 24 hrs. It sticks quickly, but allows adjustment. And it cleans up with water.
I like the hot melt idea, if you have one available.
Patriarch
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

Are you referring to a regular ol' hot glue gun that is for general around the house gluing (broken toys)? Or something more specific to woodworking?
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the wood glue cures. You only want just a little bit.
If you have some of the blue painter's masking tape, that will help as well.
Patriarch
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On Sat, 06 Nov 2004 18:44:14 GMT, patriarch

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wrote:

And works much the same way, except it dries clear, and cleans easily.
For paint grade trim, latex caulk is a hacker's best friend! ;-)
Patriarch
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Nail the trim, glue miters. Use brad nails and a drill bit the same size as the brads. If the book case is made from solid wood, gluing the trim won't work.Solid wood expands and contracts with the seasons. If the case is made from man made panels ,plywood or mdf then you can glue the trim.
mike
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On 7 Nov 2004 07:28:52 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@netzero.com (mike) wrote:

Mounting the trim to sliding dovetail tracks that are screwed to the carcase is a nice way to attach moldings to solid pieces. The moldings are glued at the front, where the miters are, but are free to slide as the side moves.
It's actually pretty easy to do as well, with a dovetail bit and router table.
Barry
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(mike) wrote:

Remember that Corey is taking his first adult ed class here, Barry. The tools and instruction seem pretty limited.
Patriarch
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On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 16:45:03 GMT, patriarch

I missed that! You're right, it wouldn't be a good beginner technique.
Once they get to a table mounted router, I'll recommend it again. <G>
Barry
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wrote:

It's a method to which I aspire, someday. When I get around to it. If I get that good. Maybe. <g>
Patriarch
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On Mon, 08 Nov 2004 22:21:19 GMT, patriarch

I'll bet you could do it now, if you have even a really basic router table and some scrap to mess around with.
The "track" gets made as a stock molding, with one pass on each side with a dovetail bit to shape it. Routing the slot in the molding is only slightly more difficult. A scrap section of molding is used to align the tracks.
Barry
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wrote:

I have all that stuff now. What I currently lack is motivation, and a project anywhere near the top of my list which would benefit from that method.
But someday...
Patriarch
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Okay, I was all set to just go with the glue based on the intitial suggestions that glue only will do the trick (with the tip of hot glue to hold the trim in place while the glue dries). Now a couple say the shifts in wood require brads.
The bookcase is made of red oak. So any other votes or change of votes on using nails as well as glue? I have a feeling the wife is going to want the piece stained and I hear that staining with nail holes puttied in doesn't work very well.
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Are the sides solid red oak, or red oak plywood?
If the sides are solid, I would not glue the entire length of molding in place. I would apply glue at the front, near the miter, with a brad or two towards the rear. The glue will hold the molding tightly near the miter, so that it dosen't open, while the brads will allow a tiny bit of movement as the sides ever so slightly change width through the seasons.
If the sides are red oak plywood, I'd glue the whole molding in place. Using tape, hot glue, or brads to hold it in place is subject to religious debate here. You can make the choice. <G>
Barry
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Then entire piece is all solid red oak.

To make sure I understand, I'm going to have a front and two side pieces of trim. Are you saying to glue all three pieces near the miters, and nail a brad towards the rear of the side pieces and no brads on the front piece? I'll see if I can convey my understanding with a little schematic (B brads, G = glue).
B B \ \ \ \ \ \ \G_______________________G
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think of it like this: if the trim molding and the solid wood face it's attached to have grain running the same direction you can fasten them solidly together with glue. if they have grain running at 90 degrees to each other you'd better use a connection that allows movement.
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Almost.
Chances are, the front piece (G-G) has grain running in the same direction as the molding. If so that part can be glued all the way along.
The side moldings (B-G) need to be glued at the mitered intersections and nailed towards the back. This firmly holds the miter together, while allowing the side to expand and contract. If the area near the miter was not glued, the movement of the side could pull the miter open, making the joint ugly.
Barry
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