Advice on using a jointer

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Two things: one, jointing the edge first and then the face (should be the other way around); two, expecting a jointer to make opposite faces of the board parallel. A jointer makes a surface flat. That's all it does. There is simply no way to ensure that the second face is parallel to the first. That's what a planer is for (or hand planes).
The proper sequence is: 1) joint one face straight and true 2) joint one edge straight and true, and square to the jointed face 3) plane the second face parallel to the first 4) ripsaw the second edge parallel to the first
The order can be altered slightly: #1 must come first, and #2 must precede #4. So you could do it 1-3-2-4 or 1-2-4-3 also.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Do one face against the jointer, then use a surface planer (else your stock won't have parallel faces). It would be preferable to use a surface planer (rather than a jointer on one side) on BOTH of the large faces--much safer too!
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Note that this does not mean to use the planer *only* and not the jointer. Rather, it means use the jointer on one face first, plane the second face parallel to the first, and then plane the first face. Jointing and then planing leaves a smoother surface than jointing alone.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

Doug, not speaking for anyone else, but when I joint a board at the proper rate, the results are nearly indistinguishable from what comes out of the planer. Granted, if I go too fast, it's not as smooth. Regardless, sanding or scraping is required for top notch results, so I don't see why it's necessary to run the jointed face through the planer unless one is cleaning up some obvious problem visible after jointing.
Dave
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One reason to do it is to remove roughly equal amounts of stock from each side of the board. In theory, this can mitigate some later movement.
-Steve
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Stephen M wrote:

Nice theory, but here's an guaranteed more accurate method to accomplish it:
1.) Joint ONE face flat.
2.) Put the jointed face down, as the board goes into a thickness planer.
After a pass or three, you can now alternate which face the planer cuts. This will remove wood from both sides and keep the faces parallel. Plane, flip, plane, flip, etc...
Barry
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Stephen M wrote:

when surface planing, than what came off at the jointer. Then I'll flip the board over and surface plane the jointed face to even out material removed from both sides. If I've jointed off "x" thickness with the jointer, and then I'm going to plane off "x" thickness, there's no need to plane both faces.
Dave
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First thing, think FEE when prepping rough stock. Faces, Edges, Ends. The reason you do the face before the edge is so you have a larger face bearing against the fence during step 2 to ensure squareness. Of course, ends won't apply until you get the stock off your jointer and get done planing the opposite face, but you get the idea. Flatten a face, plane the opposite face parallel, joint the edges, then square the ends. This doesn't address your issue of getting the faces parallel. This is what a planer or a sharp plane and a marking gauge are for.
hth,
jc
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A jointer is used to make 1 edge perpendicular to the other (given the fence is set at 90') Joint the face flat - then put that edge against the fence - then joint the edge.
Then run it thru the planer to get the faces parallel then thru the tablesaw to get the edges parallel.

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