Advice on squeeking squirrelcage motor

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This is very close to a post-mortem, as predicted by Puckdropper.
I took things apart. This is a 7.7 Amp motor for 1050 rpm. It was rather solidly mounted, so that wasn't the problem.
It was an interesting experience. There was 1 loose long bolt that attached a grounding wire between outer housing and motor itself. If there ever was a nut on the other side it is now lost. I can't get the bearing covers (?) off unless I go out and buy something. So I am going to ask a plumber friend whether he might know of a squirrelcage fan and motor that is looking for a new home. Otherwise, I may just go and get another one on eBay.
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Best regards
Han
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"Han" wrote in message

This is very close to a post-mortem, as predicted by Puckdropper.
I took things apart. This is a 7.7 Amp motor for 1050 rpm. It was rather solidly mounted, so that wasn't the problem.
It was an interesting experience. There was 1 loose long bolt that attached a grounding wire between outer housing and motor itself. If there ever was a nut on the other side it is now lost. I can't get the bearing covers (?) off unless I go out and buy something. So I am going to ask a plumber friend whether he might know of a squirrelcage fan and motor that is looking for a new home. Otherwise, I may just go and get another one on eBay.
- Han,
It sounds as if the bearings are tightly pressed onto the rotor and into the end caps, preventing you from separating the motor. A seated bearing set will only move if pressure is applied evenly and straight along shaft direction. Prying with one screwdriver is futile; you would need at least two large screwdrivers applied at the same time directly across from each other, torquing in opposite directions. Even this is doubtful to work on the tough nuts to crack.
Sometimes I'll use the weight of the stator to my advantage, being very careful to protect the shaft, and raise the motor assy and strike (gently at first) the shaft end of the rotor (traveling in a straight line with the shaft) onto the (carpetted) bench until the weight of the stator drives the front end cap off of the bearing (or the front bearing off the shaft). Unfortunately removing the rear end cap is more difficult without the mass of the stator to help and the end caps tend to be a brittle cast metal that don’t like repeated banging.
Regarding the nutless screw, if one of the adjoining screws were at all loose, one of the end caps could have skewed slightly, binding the bearing up, creating increased friction, higher heat, etc.. If the motor could be hand turned, find a nut to fit the bolt, tighten it all up making sure the end caps seat tightly and evenly into the stator frame. Having all of the screws tight may make the difference.
(The opinions and suggestion expressed above are my own and do not reflect current enginieering or electrical standards in any way.)
Scott in Dunedin FL
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Thanks, Scott, but I have indeed given up on this thing. Chalk one up for experience and in favor of the disposable society. I wonder what the town's recycling division is going to do with it ...
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Han
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I received an entire furnace gratis for the asking. Some day, I'll use the included squirrel-cage fan to blow/filter the shop air. To save the HVAC companies trouble, they often give the old units away, even when they're complete and working.
-- Never trouble another for what you can do for yourself. -- Thomas Jefferson
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"Han" wrote in message

Thanks, Scott, but I have indeed given up on this thing. Chalk one up for experience and in favor of the disposable society. I wonder what the town's recycling division is going to do with it ...
- Aye, the ease of disassembly usually offers a taste of the reassembly. Good luck then, Scott in Dunedin FL
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