Advice on squeeking squirrelcage motor

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I posted a picture of the squirrelcage motor in my homemade "air filtration system" with 18x24" filters. The motor has started to make a high pitched squeeking noise, and the center circular pieces in the picture (bearings?) are getting hot. Is there any way to lubricate, or salvage the motor, or do I need to get a new (used?) motor? This thing has had many, many hours on it, since I use it too to circulate the air in the basement. So I owe it gratitude, but can afford another motor. OTOH, if it can be saved somehow, that would be good. But I don't want it to catch fire!!!
Any advice is appreciated!
--
Best regards
Han
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Thanks, Mike!!
--
Best regards
Han
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"Han" wrote

Get an aerosol can of light grade oil (3-N-1, sewing machine, etc) along with the plastic straw that serves as an extension.
See if you can feed the straw in past the motor housing(s) so you can squirt some oil on the bearing(s).
Sometimes you can, sometimes you can't, it's a crap shoot.
If not, get a new motor from WW Grainger.
Lew
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A used furnace fan can be had cheap or free... The one in my shop is 12 years out of a 30 YO furnace, and still runs fine. It was free.
--
I used to like fishing because I thought it had some larger significance. Now I
like fishing because it¹s the one thing I can think of that probably doesn¹t. ­
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a 20" box fan at end of season price of about $10 from a big box store and get a beer.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Mike Marlow" wrote: =========================>

If they are sleeve bearings, NBD.
If they are ball bearings, you really need an arbor press to avoid brinelling the bearings during installation.
$10 for a box fan is a far more simple solution.
Lew
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Take it to a motor repair shop. They have the presses, bearings and do this professionally.
----- "Lew Hodgett" wrote in message
Lew Hodgett wrote:

"Mike Marlow" wrote: =========================>

If they are sleeve bearings, NBD.
If they are ball bearings, you really need an arbor press to avoid brinelling the bearings during installation.
$10 for a box fan is a far more simple solution.
Lew
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On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 23:19:26 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

I've installed many a bearing tapping it on with the right size socket. I'm with you on this.
Mike M
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On Thu, 27 Sep 2012 17:16:25 -0700, Mike M

Ditto. 1/2" drive sockets usually had large enough orifices to handle small shafts, and an old collapsible steering shaft tube worked to hammer the socket down over the shaft, for armature-mounted bearings and such.
I also cut old bearing races with my die cutter and a cutoff disc so I could use it to tap in the new races. Tap the old one out, cut a slot with the cutter, cool, and wire-brush the edges off. I think I have a dozen of those in various sizes in my old mechanic's toolbox.
-- Never trouble another for what you can do for yourself. -- Thomas Jefferson
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snipped-for-privacy@mindless.com says...

How well that works depends on the design of the bearing and how much force is needed to seat it. If the socke fits the inner race on a bearing that seats on the shaft or the outer on one that seats on the bore it should be fine. What you want to avoid doing is transferring the impact load via the balls or rollers.
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But, if a hammer seems too crude, you can make a cheap press at the hardware store. Buy two short ones of these, one that's a little larger than the outer flange of the bearing, one that maches the outer flange:
http://www.wdtrade.com/tradeimage/1036/361217.jpg
Buy a piece of this that is the largest size that will fit through the bearing:
http://www.oltonwelding.com/images/MVC-5162X.JPG
Buy a couple of nuts and washers that fit the all-thread. To remove the old bearing, fit the big nipple over the bearing, slide the all-thread through, put on nuts and washers, tighten nuts. To install the new bearing, put the big nipple against the hole that the bearing will go in, slide the all-thread through, slide the bearing and the small nipple on, put on nuts and washers, tighten nuts. Get a satisfied feeling when the bearing seats. Kerry
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On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 19:29:57 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Man, it's obvious you have not dome many repairs! You knock ball bearings in by driving them on the OUTER race. Usually using a suitably sized socket and a medium hammer. Care is required, of coarse - but the chance of contributing to brunelling of the bearing are excedingly remote. Bearing drivers are made and available at a reasonable price for purists and tool junkies - and are the standard recommended method of "driving" most automotive ball and roller bearings, from alternators to transmissions.

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Try running that past a bearing manufacturing application engineer and see if you can get one to salute it.
Guarantee it will never happen.
The above is total bull shit.
There was a time in my life that one of my major tasks was to oversee the design and installation of all ball bearings for an electrical rotating equipment manufacturer.
We shipped thousands units equipped with ball bearings every month.
Trust me, none of my bearing suppliers would have put holy water on what you are suggesting.
Lew
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"Lew Hodgett" wrote in message wrote:

Try running that past a bearing manufacturing application engineer and see if you can get one to salute it.
Guarantee it will never happen.
The above is total bull shit.
There was a time in my life that one of my major tasks was to oversee the design and installation of all ball bearings for an electrical rotating equipment manufacturer.
We shipped thousands units equipped with ball bearings every month.
Trust me, none of my bearing suppliers would have put holy water on what you are suggesting.
Lew - Indeed, the "proper" way to install a bearing set is to use steady, even pressure. Bearing manufacturers are quite clear on that. In practice though, repair facilities often do not have the fancy custom bearing presses available to the manufacturer.
Most bearing replacements can be accomplished using a little hammer finesse with little consequence. Once you encounter a little resistance though, the finesse turns to force, and you end up with divots in the bearing race. Usually not too severe, but if your work must pass vibration and decibel standards, you invest in a press.
You can make a mortise with a sharp screwdriver, but a mortising bit in a drill press works better. "...right tool for the job..." my 2 bits, Scott in Dunedin FL
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Yeah, and Adobe says never to open a document across a network with its software.
Doesn't mean it can't be done quite successfully.
Application engineer != Real world use
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like fishing because it¹s the one thing I can think of that probably doesn¹t. ­
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dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca says...

The real issue isn't that you won't get away with it. Most of the time you will, and you'll tell yourself that you'll remember that if it's something mission critical that lives or very expensive property depend on you'll remember to do it the right way. The trouble is that you'll have the bad habit by that time and won't remember.
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Han wrote:

motor (used) very cheap this way. If you are ever down in Georgia I have a spare unit you can have.
--
G.W. Ross

Any wire cut to length will be too short.
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On 9/26/2012 4:28 PM, Han wrote:

' Suggest double checking that the fan is attached securely. Items that do not have a firm grip can make lots of different noises.
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Thanks, Leon and all others! I will do this tomorrow.
--
Best regards
Han
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"Han" wrote in message
I posted a picture of the squirrelcage motor in my homemade "air filtration system" with 18x24" filters. The motor has started to make a high pitched squeeking noise, and the center circular pieces in the picture (bearings?) are getting hot. Is there any way to lubricate, or salvage the motor, or do I need to get a new (used?) motor? This thing has had many, many hours on it, since I use it too to circulate the air in the basement. So I owe it gratitude, but can afford another motor. OTOH, if it can be saved somehow, that would be good. But I don't want it to catch fire!!!
Any advice is appreciated!
--
Han,

I've never seen a bad bearing in these small motors cause a fire, but I
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