advice on router bits for cabinet doors

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trying to decide whether to buy 1/4 inch rail and stile bits for my current ryobi benchtop table for door making as a hobby or to splurge and purchase 1/2 inch dewalt router 2 1/4 horsepower from lowes.
I am not sure if the dewalt will fit my table though.
This is just a hobby right now.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

1/4 horsepower from lowes.

you plan also on making raised panels (which requires a larger-diameter cutter) you will definitely need the larger shank and more powerful router.
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On 3/26/2013 8:24 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ryobi benchtop table for door making as a hobby or to splurge and purchase 1/2 inch dewalt router 2 1/4 horsepower from lowes.

1/4" shank bits are fine for lite work and as long as you take shallow passes to remove stock. Not even a bad idea with a worn 1/2" shank bit.
That said, most better quality 1/4" shank bits are turned down the same sized material that 1/2" bit are made from so the big deal in investment expense will be the up grade to a larger capacity router. The difference in price between like 1/2" and 1/4" shank bits is slight and especially if you buy a set of bits.
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Is varible spped control required for 1/4 inch bits?
I am wanting to make a vanity mirror frame for my wifes bathroom and thought it would be a good project. I thought I could do raised panels on the table saw or get a 1/4 inch verticle raised panel bit.
Sorry for all the questions.
On Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:24:47 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ryobi benchtop table for door making as a hobby or to splurge and purchase 1/2 inch dewalt router 2 1/4 horsepower from lowes.

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On 3/26/2013 9:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Not as long as the largest part of the bit, the cutting end, is no more than 1" in diameter. Bits that small are typically run at 20k+ RPM. Because of the greater tip speed on the larger diameter bits you need to slow them down.

it would be a good project. I thought I could do raised panels on the table saw or get a 1/4 inch verticle raised panel bit. I am not a big fan of the vertical raised panel bits as they will only cut straight edges, you have to go horizontal bits for panels with arches or concave profiles. Also with a 1/4" shank vertical bit I would think you would stand a much greater chance of incurring increased run out and less desirable results.

Actually woodworking questions are more than welcome.

ryobi benchtop table for door making as a hobby or to splurge and purchase 1/2 inch dewalt router 2 1/4 horsepower from lowes.

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NO, NO, NO! If he wants to ask questions here, he first has to take part in a newsgroup wide argument ~ with cursing and swearing being a highly desired attribute.
Where have you been Leon? Don't you know how this newsgroup works?
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On 3/26/2013 4:19 PM, Dave wrote:

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So is a table saw ok if not doing a arched type raised panel?
If I were to get a bigger router, how could I tell if I can make it work on my benchtop ryobi table?
Most of my tools are not great quality. I have a delta benchtop table saw from lowes, a harbor freight miter saw, a 1950's era jointer, a craftsman planer and the ryobi benchtop router and table. I wish I had better stuff....
On Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:24:47 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ryobi benchtop table for door making as a hobby or to splurge and purchase 1/2 inch dewalt router 2 1/4 horsepower from lowes.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

If you make raised panels on a table saw, you're limited to panels with beveled or coved edges. With a router, you can produce whatever type of edges you can find a bit for.

RTFM. The owner's manual for the router table probably tells what routers will and won't fit it.

Lots of people have done very good work with tools no better than that. Don't worry about upgrading your tools until you find that your technique has improved to the point that your ability to produce better work is limited by the tools and not by your own skills.
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"Doug Miller" wrote in message

Good advice... another dimension I'd include in that assessment is safety. If the material you are working with is too big for the tools you have you may need bigger tools or another way to perform the task. For example, I went to a heavy 8" jointer when I had my 6" jointer standing on end while jointing long heavy stock. I went to the 3 HP shaper with it's larger table and more power when I struggled on two jobs in a row with my 1.5 HP shaper. It's the old "if it feels unsafe it probably is unsafe" philosophy.
John
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Face that decision when you need to address it, mean while, you have a 1/4" router that probably operates around 22-25,000 RPM.
Stick with bits that are 1" dia max and you are good to go.
As far as a router table is concerned, I've been in shops that used a couple of saw horses with a 36 x 36 x 3/4 piece of MDF as the table.
The fixed base of a 3 HP router was mounted to the bottom side and they were in business.
About as down and dirty as it gets, but it works.
Down the road, if you want to pursue the hobby, get a set of drawings from the NYW and build their router work station.
I built one, it was a fun project and very usefull.
Then you can spend some serious money and buy a Milwaukee 5625, 3 HP, Router to mount in the station.
Now you have a router that will safely swing those 3" router bits.
-----------------------------------------------------------------

Don't sweat the petty stuff, we all start some place.
BTW, age does not devalue a tool.
Try some simple projects that can be built using the tools you have at first, not including cutting bits (drill, router, etc).
If you like it, buy a new tool for the next project.
Check out WoodSmithShop on line and if you have PBS available.
They have some interesting projects and the plans are free.
Have fun.
Lew
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On 3/27/13 11:33 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Yep. I find that starting with minimalism and going from there helps you rule out a bunch of crap you don't need that is generally included in the $500+ tables you see in the catalogs.
When you do decide to buy some router-table specific doohickey it's because you genuinely want/need it to improve upon technique you've already acquired for using a router.
The cart goes in front of the horse with a lot of guys who buy all that crap before ever touching a router. They think they have to use all the bells and whistle and let that stuff dictate the what and how in their projects.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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These are the bits I am looking at :(Amazon.com product link shortened)
However, it looks like they are over one inch. I guess I could purchase speed controlfor my exisiting router?
On Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:24:47 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ryobi benchtop table for door making as a hobby or to splurge and purchase 1/2 inch dewalt router 2 1/4 horsepower from lowes.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

At 1 5/8" diameter, I don't think that's going to be a problem. I wouldn't go larger than that without a speed controller, or a variable-speed router, though.
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On 3/26/13 9:54 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

:(Amazon.com product link shortened)

The problem with a speed control unit on a weaker router is that you'll lose horsepower, fast, when you lower the speed. I think you'd be frustrated by how slowly it cuts.

No one ever regrets getting a better router. :-) If you're worried about the table, you could build your own, on the cheap. Don't be intimidated by all the Cadillac router tables you see on the internet. You don't need all those bells and whistles to do great work.
http://mikedrums.com/bookcases.jpg
I made all the trim and molding for these book cases with my Porter Cable router mounted to the bottom of a 1/2" sheet a melamine, which was the top of a makeshift assembly table. I just used the plastic base to mark the three mounting holes, then drilled countersunk holes for the mounting screws and a bigger hole in the center for the bits. When I needed a fence, I cut slots in the tabletop. When I needed feather-boards, I screwed them down directly to the table top.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

:(Amazon.com product link shortened)

There is no problem with their size. A rabbet bit is as big.
--

dadiOH
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Unfortunately my table was a gift many years ago. I dont have the manual.
On Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:24:47 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ryobi benchtop table for door making as a hobby or to splurge and purchase 1/2 inch dewalt router 2 1/4 horsepower from lowes.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote in

So check the manufacturer's web site to see if you can download or purchase one.
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So you mounted the router straight to the 1/2 inch mdf and did not use an insert?
On Tuesday, March 26, 2013 8:24:47 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

ryobi benchtop table for door making as a hobby or to splurge and purchase 1/2 inch dewalt router 2 1/4 horsepower from lowes.

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On 3/26/13 1:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Assuming you're replying to me :-).....
Yep, directly to the tabletop. No seems and the melamine was very smooth, so the wood moved effortlessly across the top.
Your router probably has some sort of plastic plates that sits on it when it's not in the table mount, right? That can be used as a template. If not, get some cheap little allen head set screw the same thread as the router base. Insert them, point side out, into the router base, dab a little nail polish or paint or oil on the tips. Place the router down or up against the mdf (or whatever you use) and it will mark the holes. You can also sharpen the allen screws to pointy tips and just press hard to leave indents in the table top to mark the hole locations.
--

-MIKE-

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