Advice on cleaning up some wood


I've been given four 8' x 6" x 5/4 hit-or-miss quarter-sawn oak boards. Unfortunately they sat in a shed for a year or so and ended up covered with dirt. The dirt has sand and small stone particles in it.
I can brush most of it off, but I'm not crazy about putting it through a planer and wrecking the blades on any ground-in particles. Any ideas for cleaning them off without ruining my planer blades?
--
Vince Heuring To email, remove the Vince.

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Vince Heuring wrote:
> I've been given four 8' x 6" x 5/4 hit-or-miss quarter-sawn oak boards. > Unfortunately they sat in a shed for a year or so and ended up covered > with dirt. The dirt has sand and small stone particles in it. > > I can brush most of it off, but I'm not crazy about putting it through > a planer and wrecking the blades on any ground-in particles. Any ideas > for cleaning them off without ruining my planer blades?
I'd fine a local commercial sander drum sanding operation and let them bring the boards to final size.
After that, plan on using as soon as possible.
Lew
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A wire brush should help. Or maybe a soft/fine wire wheel on your drill if you're in a hurry? Haven't tried it, but it's an idea... Andy
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Or wait 'til your blades are_just_about ready to go in for sharpening. Plane after giving them a good wire brushing/inspection, of course. Tom
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Vince Heuring wrote:

the metal detector. After that it's the belt sander followed by more shop vacuum. Then the jointer to square up an edge and a face. Finally the planer to make everything smooth and parallel.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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Belt Sander to get the grit off. Then once that is gone, your regular jointer/planer.
Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com + Over 100 detailed woodworking product reviews now online! + ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 6 Reviews: - Veritas Low Angle Smooth Plane - Kreg Bandsaw Fence - Triton 5" Random Orbit Sander - "Hold-It" Magnetic Drill Bit Holders - Ryobi One+ Cordless Tool System - Kreg K3 Pocket Hole System ------------------------------------------------------------
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How bad are they? Will a power washer clean them up well enough? If it's just dirt that has settled on the wood then you can probably power wash them just fine. Dirt that simply settles does not get ground into the grain.
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-Mike-
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A belt sander will remove most of the junk.

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On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 20:50:31 -0600, Vince Heuring

Brush first, then move to a wire brush and finally to a sander with 100-150 grit, that'll take out the surface dirt and mess. You might end up going through a couple sheets of sandpaper, but it's better than ruining your planer blades, isn't it?
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