Advice needed on LARGE cut off saw

I need to cut 5" columns in a single pass with same quality of cut finish as my 10" carbide 100 tooth blade gives. Don't want to go to 16" plus table saw or radial arm because of expense and floor space involved. I thought of using a 16" Makita circular saw and making a frame for it to slide in which would basically be a LARGE sliding compound miter saw. The only problem I see so far is that I can only find a 108 tooth carbide blade and I am not sure of the quality of cut it will give. Advice/suggestions appreciated on: 1. Basic idea and/or other solutions 2 Quality of cut of 108 tooth blade 3. Source of 16" blades more than 108 teeth
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Art Ransom
Lancaster,TX
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wrote:

check out the hitachi 15" miter saw. i have 2 of these and with the 100 tooth or the 110 tooth blade does a fine job. i can cut a 6x6 square all but the last 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch and a sander cleans up the nub. they aint cheep but worth every penny IMO.
skeez
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Contact Ridge Carbide Tool. www.ridgecarbidetool.com They don't sow them on the web page, but they make many different 16" blades, including one with 150 teeth. It may not be suitable for your use though. At Ridge, you can actually get a real person on the phone that can better help you.
You probably know to put the quality of cut before the number of teeth in a blade. Not ground properly, a high tooth count is going to give less desirable results than a properly set blade.
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How often to do you need to do this? Is this a regular production item, in a shop? Or in the field?
Are these always the same length, or do they need to be custom fit?
Are these columns turned, or something other than cirular in cross section?
What material?
So many questions...
Patriarch
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Art Ransom wrote:

Tom Plamann's solution was to mount the arm of a cut off saw to his lathe. See:
http://www.plamann.com/sys-tmpl/lathe/view.nhtml?profile=lathe&UID 008
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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That is a very elegant solution, I must say. That must have required some rather complex work with a dial indicator...
What about using a jump saw?
JP **************** Meliora.
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Hey Art. The 16" Makita with the stock carbide blade does a good job, but maynot be what you need for a finish cut. They look good to me, but..... More teeth on the Makita probably isn't the answer. They don't have the torque. I think a new, well sharpened stock carbide blade will be the best you can do going that route. I have the saw, but my blade is pretty dull now. How many and how often? Thought about a hand saw?
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Ross
Greenville, TX
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ummm...bandsaw? with extension table/rollers/transfer balls to make it easy to slide the column?
Hell, if this is production work, get a smallish Delta bandsaw, mount it on a sliding platform....make a table for the columns...move the saw, not the column.
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Try a chain saw. If you don't want to buy one, you can rent from your local rental place. Use a belt sander to smooth the surfaces.
Dick

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