Advice Needed

I need a huge quantity of 7ft long posts that are 2-5/8" x 2-5/8" x 2-5/8" equilateral triangular in cross section.
I've been prototyping by gluing up a pair of SYP 2x3s studs and then ripping them to dimension. While this does the job, it's not practical for high volume production.
The finished post in used in an indoor architectural application where it is under a maximum of 100 pounds of compression.
The glued up and trimmed pieces I make takes advantage of opposite grains to prevent warping and make it more bow resistant.
The question comes down to - how can I get these mass produced and be certain I'm not going to end up with a lot of expensive scrap? Is this grain dependent for bow characteristics. Do I have to used glued up pieces? Would I have less trouble with red oak or poplar?
Anybody have the facilities to make 15,000 of these and guarantee their characteristics?
Any advice is greatly appreciated.
Eric, Wayne, PA
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For that quantity you should be talking to companies that specialize in wood products. It is not a job for a cabinet shop or lumber yard. There are companies that turn out thousands of cutting boards, table legs, boxes, etc. They will have the equipment and resources to give you exactly what you want with no scrap.
Try the Thomas Register and I'm sue you will find a few potential suppliers. http://www.thomasregisterdirectory.com/wood_products/index.html
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Sun, Jul 4, 2004, 1:17am snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Eric) says: I need a huge quantity of 7ft long posts that are 2-5/8" x 2-5/8" x 2-5/8" equilateral triangular in cross section. <snip> under a maximum of 100 pounds of compression. <snip>
You didn't bother to clarify what they'll be used for, but sounds like something I'd rather have made from steel.
JOAT Just because it's not nice doesn't mean it's not miraculous. - Interesting Times
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Try companies that mass produce legs such as http://www.adamswood.com /
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Sounds like what they made up here for cedar fence rails after the folks stopped splitting them by hand.
Helped the farmer up the road install a bunch as electric fence poles. Guy who had over a cord of 'em charged him a nickel apiece. Got any place that makes fence rails?

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15,000? Shees. You don't say if they must be wood, but except for design esthetics, wood would be my last choice. First choice would be extruded aluminum. That quantity will easily justify an extrusion die set. A die set might be less than $500 and you will be obligated to a billet quantity of aluminum, probably 2000#.
If you need wood, then I would talk to a mill that does that sort of work. Again, depending on esthetics, finger jointed shorts, like is used in door casing or molding, would be cheaper. This is not a job for a cabinet maker.
-- Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com/woodshop

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I know nothing of what you are producing. Is there a reason for them to be wood. As much as I love wood, it can easily warp, twist, have knots, and alll other manner of unique discrepancies.
I think it might be beneficial to talk to an aluminum extrusion company. They may even have a die that would lend itself to your needs.
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