Advice - Johanssen (?) Stroke Sander

A local company has a 4X8 unit for sale inexpensively. What are these guys worth and are they worth the space they take up? I don't know how many veneer table tops I would make. What else are they good for? Thanks again to the group for advice. Respectfully, Ron Moore
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Ron Moore wrote:

I don't know. I am not familiar with Johanssen. Could Johanssen have been the dealer that sold it and everyone is looking at the stick on dealer label?

Yes! Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes and yes. "If" you have the space. If you can make the space, I'd make it.

Sanding. Sanding anything and everything that will fit beneath the belt. Better than a drum sander, usually faster and cheaper, way cheaper than a wide belt.

Well, teknikally the group has done nothing for you but as it's representative today I'll accept your thanks.
sigh...
UA100, who wishes he had the space but pining for a Boice-Crane stroke sander none the less...
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The manufacturer, Johanssen, is Swedish as I remember and the name is in the casting. It's definitely heavy old iron. I should have the space in the new building but wanted to make sure it wasn't too limited in application. Thank goodness I found a three phase panel in the building today. I was getting a bit worried. It's not wye but it will work. The thanks are for this and SEVERAL other such inquiries in the past. Ron
Unisaw A100 wrote:

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Stroke sanders were one day a wonderful piece of machinery my first experience with one was about 20' long in trade school when the belt broke on that sucker it would cut you up real bad if you did not hear the gunshot sound and drop to the floor as quick. I have owned two of them myself, one of which I forgot the brand name, it was was a nice compact small unit and the Boice Crane unit which I think they had only the one model.
Since the development of the drum sanders, Stroke sanders have become extinct they are a pain in the ass, it is a lot of skillful tiring work to use it and you still could never get your material very flat.
No matter what you bought this unit for you will then go broke buying sandpaper I don't know what the current cost is but I would expect about 25 to 30.00 a belt and they get hot and snap real easy. you need graphite blocks and graphite gloves also This is definitely not a machine for occasional use, it is not a home workshop tool and if one could afford one they would be better off buying one of the smaller drum sanders.
There was some remarks about venneer work and the stroke sander, generally not to be used in the same sentence. The stroke sander was used more to flatten glued up stock, even the finer belts would quickly ruin a veneered top.
Good Luck, George

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Ron
Personally, I would get the sander. I have a 10" x 4' stroke sander that I have had for the past 12 years. It is the most versatile and useful piece of machinery I own. I use the graphite glove to do contour sanding. Things like large cove crown or hand rails get sanded with ease and speed. I also do a lot of flat work on it using all sorts of graphite blocks. I can drop the bed 37" below the belt and place an entire cabinet on if I need to do some sanding on an assembled piece. Try to do that through a drum sander. I have a wide assortment of belt grits and have even done cool brushed aluminum and stainless work with it. The belts last a long time and are not that costly. (30.00 average for an 8" x 300" belt. I have never had one break on me. They are somewhat tricky to learn how to master. Kind of like patting your head and rubbing your tummy type thing. But if you learn how to work one they are great. If you can't work it, you will say they are a pain in the ass.
Tom Plamann www.plamann.com

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