Advice for repair of wood stool

Trying my hand at the repair of an Amish made wooden stool for a friend. Two years ago, one of the rungs broke out so I turned a replacement and put it back with some good old yellow glue.
Now the rung on the other side of the stool has broken. Turned another one and then noticed something I didn't while doing the repair last time. Every rung and legs has a Kreg screw angled into the joint from the bottom. I removed the screws and found all but one were broken. I think they did more damage to the joints than they helped. Stool came apart rather easily at this point. I've cleaned up the rungs and legs as well as the matching sockets.
So, two questions. Would you use good old yellow glue or would something else be better suited? Screws or no screws? Thanks in advance for the wisdom.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/23/2014 7:47 PM, Bruce Kaatz wrote:

I doubt it's Amish made, I don't think they would use screws. No screws.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have Amish made furniture. They absolutely use screws and like anything else Amish furniture ranges from high quality to not so good.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bruce Kaatz" wrote:

Using screws would not be my choice.
If you plan on rebuilding again in a few years, then use hyde glue.
If you want to do it once and forget it, then use epoxy thickened with microballoons.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/23/2014 10:54 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

broken by some one standing one it is going to be a tough repair. Joints are not the only reason that something has to be repaired.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/23/2014 7:47 PM, Bruce Kaatz wrote:

You are right in thinking that the screw probably did more damage than good. Yellow wood glue will be just fine. Clean off all traces of the old glue, wet the joint well with new glue, and clamp it up. Don't reinstall the screw. While the joint is clamped up you can fill the old screw hole. I've done hundreds of institutional furniture repairs this way, and if done well, it's a permanent fix.
The screws would have been used by the manufacturer in place of clamps only in order to speed production, and no longer serves any purpose.
JP
--
This is my signature. Really. I'm not kidding. Stop reading now.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"John Paquay" wrote in message
On 11/23/2014 7:47 PM, Bruce Kaatz wrote:

You are right in thinking that the screw probably did more damage than good. Yellow wood glue will be just fine. Clean off all traces of the old glue, wet the joint well with new glue, and clamp it up. Don't reinstall the screw. While the joint is clamped up you can fill the old screw hole. I've done hundreds of institutional furniture repairs this way, and if done well, it's a permanent fix.
The screws would have been used by the manufacturer in place of clamps only in order to speed production, and no longer serves any purpose.
************ I am getting ready to do a stool like yours.
I plan to judge how much extra room inside the joint, and use a saw to make a cut in the end of the tenion, all most to the exposed portion. Then take and make a wedge to fit in the cut that when pushed just flush with the end, will cause the tenion to expand enough to tighten up. When you clamp the crosspieces in with the splits and wedges, it forces the wedge in and tightens the joint. Of course, use carpenters glue and clean off the old first.
-- Jim in NC
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
< snips >

Yep - or by a previous repair effort .. John T.
--- ---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for the advice. Confirmed my thinking as to the screws. Like the idea of epoxy, but since this is the second rung I've had to replace, I had better not go that route. Looked at this stools sister and it was also assembled with screws - and guessing they did serve the purpose of clamps. I'll ask the Amish family next time I go and get wood and see what they say.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 11/25/2014 7:55 PM, Bruce Kaatz wrote:

Just a thought here, not all Amish are wood working experts. I would not assume they know squat about furniture.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

they do great work. As I've never seen them do any sort of seating furniture, I'm betting they get the chairs and stools from someone else. Looking forward to the visit to learn a bit about their business model and outsourcing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bruce Kaatz" wrote:

<snip>

Lots of Amish in the furniture building business including some just a few miles from where I grew up.
Just curious, where is this group located.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

West central Wisconsin. There are several different "settlements", if I recall the term correctly, in western Wisconsin and those settlements are made up of districts with groups of families. In our immediate area their local Bishop seems to hold sway over what sort of industry a family participates in. My Amish friends family does primarily dining tables. Two farms down the road is an sawmill (mostly red oak and pine) and next door to the mill is a family that runs a wood kiln. Other familys up and down the road build other sorts of furniture and craft items. If you choose to buy direct from them in our part of the state it is a bit of a treasure hunt to find who makes what - but makes for an interesting adventure. That being said, most of our local Amish sell at "wholesale" to a couple of retail outfits that in turn sell to the "English" - both locals and tourists. Some won't sell their goods out of the shop at all.
Interesting folks to deal with and all have been very fair and honest in my experience. I've always received more lumber than I've purchased - I've heard "wouldn't want to cheat you" every time I purchase - and 10% extra seems to be the norm. I never get that at a big box store. <grin>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bruce Kaatz" wrote:

My boss once had a house built by the Amish.
Father and sons.
Guy would NOT quote a price, only worked by the hour.
Pay as you go.
My boss said he got a fair deal when all was said and done.
Since they used NO power tools, they didn't have to wait until the electric company spotted a pole and pulled in power like my dad did when he had a house built.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

hard maple from someplace up in Canada. My Amish friend paid the driver with cash, a huge stack of100 dollar bills. Driver counted it and wrote out a recipt and headed out (for a bank I'm guessing). My Amish friend commented after he left, "I don't think he thought I was honest, he counted all the money." I got a chuckle out of that. Usually when I pay him, he just tucks the money in his center desk drawer - without counting, unless I insist.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.