Adjusted the fence last night...

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On 10/6/2010 9:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

thought of making the splitter part be removable. Thanks! Harvey
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Lee Valley Tools sells that splitter in two incarnations should you be interested in a purchase. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pQ151&cat=1,41080,51225 http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pe138&cat=1,41080,51225
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On 10/7/2010 7:41 AM, Upscale wrote:

harvey
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"eclipsme" wrote:

This one is a winner.
http://preview.tinyurl.com/29sc94h
Have personally used it on PM66, General and Unisaw.
Lew
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Translucent plastic incasing steel. I have been using this style for about 4 years and it holds up well.
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wrote:

Throw that surfboard on the planer and take off 1/8". Now put on a steel bottom with steel fin (welded) comin' up. Screw and glue, done.
-- Know how to listen, and you will profit even from those who talk badly. -- Plutarch
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On 10/6/2010 11:32 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Harvey
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On 10/6/10 8:16 AM, eclipsme wrote:

I guess the improvement would be to have a few spares sitting, ready to go in.
When I made my ZCI's, I contemplated using 2 trim screws to hold in the splitter, instead of glue, so I could take it out when running dados, etc. But then I figured I'd I have to take the ZCI out of the table to take the splitter out. I may as well just have another ZCI made, sans splitter, and just swap them.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 10/6/2010 12:27 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

wouldn't it? Just make 2. Thanks. Harvey
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On 10/7/10 6:15 AM, eclipsme wrote:

Or 5 or 6 or 7. :-) One for each blade or dado set you use. Once you are set up to make one, the other take 1/10 of the time.
--

-MIKE-

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Can't agree with that statement, while to some the thought of the fence veering away from the blade to create "some" clearance between the fence,work, and blade this pulls danger out of the right pocket and puts it in the left pocket.
The work tracking away from the right back side of the blade also causes the wood to track into the blade on the opposite side.
Use a splitter to and a parallel fence for best and safest results.
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On 10/4/10 8:03 AM, Leon wrote:

At least a couple fence manufacturers suggest the set-up technique of having the outboard end on the fence a couple thousandths out.
I don't know if I agree with it or not. I think a splitter does the most to stop kickback.
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I have seen several manufacturers especially the blade manufacturers recommend the tilted out setting. They are mostly trying to sell a blade or fence with particular focus being placed on the piece against the fence. They typically do not rip a 1x8 down the center so much as work pieces with a majority of the wood ending up against the fence.
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On 10/4/2010 9:03 AM, Leon wrote:

using one because of the PITA quotient. I use hold downs and skew the fence very slightly away from the blade as discussed. I never use the fence on the opposite side, so that really doesn't matter for me.
Harvey
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Although you do not use the fence on the opposite side often let me restate, If your fence is skewed away from the blade and you are ripping a 1x6 into say 2 or more usable pieces the waste side will be pulled into the blade on the back opposite side of the blade. This will both add tooth marks to the wast eside of the board and will prevent the whole board from tracking properly against the fence.
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On 10/7/2010 9:23 AM, Leon wrote:

envisioning more skew than I am using. I don't seem to experience this problem, but will look for them specifically next time I rip.
Harvey
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The teeth a on a carbide sawblade are slightly wider than the steel body of the blade. The fence would have to be skewed so far so that a workpiece would contact the blade body before the trailing (rising) teeth for it to keep from tracking against the teeth properly. You probably have a point about the tooth marks (or is it teeth marks) though. (BTW I am in "dead parallel" camp because I sometimes use the fence to the left of the blade.
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with the average voter. (Winston Churchill)
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On Oct 3, 8:02am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

"The combination square indicated the blade was parallel..."
Oy vey.
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On Oct 3, 6:02am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

Enjoy your "new table saw" !
Some people -- when they lay out the steps for a new project -- include "setting up all the machines," (saws and jointer, for me, primarily) before they begin.
I don't do it *nearly* so often, but ... I think of setup as I think of oil changes, and probably with the same frequency.
Like everything else, once you're in the habit, it only takes a few minutes with a good square (combination, machinist's, or other) to be sure that everything is square and parallel, as it ought to be.
On the bandsaw, for example, the square checks take ... like a minute, and -- almost always -- checking bearing clearance is a lightning fast visual. Mine don't seem to come out of adjustment, unless (obviously) I've done a blade change.
And the difference -- to carry on the car analogy -- IS improved safety AND performance.
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