Adjustable shelves

What's the best way to mount adjustable shelves inside a wood cabinet? The shelves were made from 3/4" birch plywood.
I was going to drill holes for shelf pins, with a jig made from peg board. These would be the pins with a flat protrusion on which the shelf rests. But then there's also the type of pin that's recessed into the bottom of the shelf (I assume a router is used to cut out the groove in the shelf bottom). This type would prevent the shelf from moving laterally.
Another problem is that I made a stupid newbie mistake and cut the shelves a bit too narrow for the space they're going into. I lined up the saw on the wrong side of the line and the shelves are about 1/4" too narrow (1/8" on either side). Will this affect the stability of the pins or put excessive stress on the wood near each pin hole? if something heavy is placed on the shelf? If so, is there a solution besides cutting new shelves (there are only two, so it's not too big of a deal). Maybe I can glue a 1/4" strip of wood to one side of each shelf to widen it. Or maybe there's some kind of nylon or steel spacer/extender that I can place in between the shelf edge and the vertical member?
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A strip of wood or just finish the shelve ends off with veneer stripping. If you feel that you're still not adding enough for the mistake, you can veneer them again.
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Look for the style of pin that is an 'L' shape with the round pin formed on the vertical leg of the 'L' Looks something like ' -L ' in cross section. The flat metal part is roughly 1/16" in thickness so they will help take up some of the side to side play in your shelves (Assuming that visually the shelves are OK with you. Remember when the shelves are in use the gap may well be out of sight anyway. )
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore, Maryland - snipped-for-privacy@charm.net
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Best depends on mission...
Some methods:
Shelf pins work great in cabinetry and the holes aren't that intrusive.
Metal tracks are easiest to install and stronger than pins, but are very visible and maybe considered a tad ugly. These are best left for utility type stuff, like commercial shelving.
In finer furniture, I prefer to cut hardwood strips, drill 1" to 1 1/2" holes, the actual size and spacing dependent on specifics, and rip the strips in half. the strips are then glued to the inside corners of the shelves. The strips are strong,are barely visible, and pretty if you can actually see them.

Yup on all of that. The bottom groove can also be cut on a table saw with a dado set.

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> Maybe I can glue a 1/4" strip of wood to one side of each
> shelf to widen it.
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... snip

Do you have a link or some pictures of that method? I'm having a hard time visualizing it (probably too early in the morning), but this sounds intriguing.
Thanks
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I can sent a picture of a bookshelf support strip that probably matches his description (will remove books and the shelf to take the picture).....I inherited a 100yr old bookshelf from my Grandmother that uses something similar....At least on mine you have two strips center drilled then center ripped..now you have four strips.... front and back on both the left and right sides of the bookshelf get the strips. Make wood support bars with matching rounded ends (to fit the half round holes).....Then each shelf has the corners notched to fit around the original half strip.....a picture would be clearer<G>...anyway its pretty sharp and very functional.....and the only way I'll ever build adjustable shelves in the future...my last bookshelf I use pins and holes but never again.... Rod
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On Wed, 3 Jan 2007 08:46:57 -0800, "Rod & Betty Jo"

That's exactly what I'm talkin' about!!!
Just for grins, do you happen to know what area the bookshelf originated from? The items I've seen this on in my area seem to be local, southern New England items. I've not seen the method in any books, so I wonder how often it was used.
Once you've seen it, pins look really, really bad. Once you've done it once... <G>
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wrote:

She passed away nearly 30 years ago so I can't ask but I would expect Indiana.....At least that is where she was raised, first set up house and where her piano was built. The bookshelf itself is a interesting piece, just enough detail to make it unique and either the glue failed<g> or it is held together with just joinery since it can be pretty much disassembled board by board ( haven't moved it for at least 20 years)....It was apparently built for a corner (or it is half of a matching bookshelf) since one side is flat where-as the other is not....Not sure of the wood (fairly dark stain and probably darker with age) but the face frame has a very nice grain pattern, maybe a walnut something?....eventually I'd like to build a copy including the joinery. Rod
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

Unfortunately, I don't. I'll be glad to try to provide a clearer example.
For a 3/4" thick shelf:
- Make a to 3/8" thick strip of hardwood about 1 1/2" wide. - Drill 3/4" holes down the center of the strip, spaced where you'd like to provide shelf options. Say... 5" apart. - Rip the strip in half - Glue each half to the inside end of the case, with the "half holes" facing each other and at the same level front to back. - Cut the shelf to the inside width of the case, minus ONE strip thickness (3/8")and a hair.
--- From here, we have two options ----
#1: - Mark the ends of the shelves with the appropriate radius (3/4"), and round 3/8" of each end to mate with the "half holes" - Install "spring strips" made of brass, or any other springy metal to approximately center the shelf. These have to be almost flush when installing the shelf in the case. Loose hardwood wedges can also perform this task - Slip the shelf into one end, and carefully pop the other end in
#2 - Make 3/8" thick "crossmembers" that fit into the holes. - Notch the ends of the shelves square to clear the rails. - Add a thin strip to the bottom of each shelf to contain the crossmember
The shelves can be slid to one side, removed and reconfigured at will.
I got this idea from some antique "side-by-sides" (mini desk & cabinet) I saw at an estate auction. The method is too time consuming for cabinetry, but looks much better in fine furniture than metal pins and holes.
On a side note, drilling a series of holes in a planed tubafour, then ripping it down the center, makes a GREAT glue-up bed for pipe clamps
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... snip
Thanks. That's much clearer. Also, thanks to Rod & Betty Jo for the offer to provide a picture (e-mail on the way).
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Trying to picture this. Do you then use a cleat with rounded ends between these two strips, with shelves, notched for the strips, resting on the cleats?
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alexy wrote:

That's one way of hanging the shelf. I described the other in another follow-up.
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I have glued a 1/4" strip on when I made the same mistake. It was in a place where it wouldn't be seen, or I would have replaced the shelf.
Properly you should cut your piece cross grain so it moves the same as shelf; but if your house is airconditioned and humidified you can probably get away with cutting with the grain, which would be rather stronger.
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You forgot to quote this part of the OP's message: "The shelves were made from 3/4" birch plywood." So better to rip the 1/4" strip.
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wrote:

You are right! Sorry. And if he is putting veneer across the front, it will somewhat hide the addition.

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